Skip to main content
//empty //empty

Featured below are companies that have experienced recent insider trading activity in the public market through their direct and indirect ownerships, including accounts they have control or direction over.

The list features insider transaction activity; it does not convey total ownership information as an insider may hold numerous accounts.

Keep in mind, when looking at transaction activities by insiders, purchasing activity may reflect perceived value in a security. Selling activity may or may not be related to a stock’s valuation; perhaps an insider needs to raise money for personal reasons. An insider’s total holdings should be considered because a sale may, in context, be insignificant if this person has a large remaining position in the company. I tend to put great weight on insider transaction activity when I see multiple insiders trading a company’s shares or units.

Story continues below advertisement

Listed below is a security that has had recent buying activity reported by an insider.

Canfor Corp. (CFP-T)

In a relatively small transaction, on Aug. 27, Peter Bentley purchased 5,000 shares at a cost per share of $17.98, increasing this account’s holdings to 492,607 shares. The cost of this investment totaled approximately $90,000.

In 2019, Mr. Bentley retired from his position as the company’s chairman and chief executive officer.

**

Listed below are four stocks that have had selling activity reported by insiders.

Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CM-T)

Story continues below advertisement

On Sept. 1, Christina Kramer, senior executive vice-president and group head of technology, infrastructure and innovation, exercised her options, receiving 4,181 shares at a cost per share of $78.50, and sold 4,181 shares at a price per share of $103.69, leaving 8,465 shares in this particular account. Net proceeds totaled over $105,000, not including any associated transaction charges.

Kinaxis Inc. (KXS-T)

On Sept. 2, president and chief executive officer John Sicard divested 9,200 shares at a price per share of $215.1125, trimming this particular account’s position to 224,367 shares. Proceeds from the sale exceeded $1.9-million, not including commission charges.

On Sept. 2, chief financial officer and vice-president of corporate services Richard Monkman sold 20,000 shares at a price per share of $214.241 for an account in which he has control or direction over (2496248 Ontario Inc.), leaving 27,027 shares in this specific account. Proceeds from the sale totaled over $4.2-million, excluding trading fees.

Year-to-date, the share price of this technology stock is up 81 per cent.

Parex Resources Inc. (PXT-T)

Story continues below advertisement

On Sept. 1, the current chairman and the company’s former chief executive officer and president Wayne Foo exercised his options, receiving 40,000 shares at a cost per share of $10.96, and sold 40,000 shares at a price per share of approximately $18.18. Net proceeds exceeded $288,000, not including any associated transaction fees. After these transactions, this particular account held 1,580,520 shares.

Wheaton Precious Metals Corp. (WPM-T)

On Sept. 9, chief financial officer Gary Brown exercised his options, receiving 22,150 shares at a cost per share of $27.51, and sold 22,150 shares at a price per share of $72.17, after which this specific account held 30,246 shares. Net proceeds totaled over $989,000, not including any associated transaction charges.

Be smart with your money. Get the latest investing insights delivered right to your inbox three times a week, with the Globe Investor newsletter. Sign up today.

Follow related topics

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Tickers mentioned in this story
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies