Skip to main content

Market News The close: TSX lifted by Bombardier, Precision Drilling, and Constellation

The steepest decline in U.S. retail sales since 2009 in December halted a broad rally in world stock markets on Thursday and pushed investors into the safety of government bonds.

But while the Dow and S&P 500 closed lower on Wall Street, Canada’s stock market rose, powered by unexpectedly strong earnings results from several large cap companies. The Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX rose 69.25 points, or 0.44 percent, to 15,695.98. The TSX is now up 9.6 percent for the year.

Leading the index were Bombardier Inc, up 23.0 percent, Precision Drilling Corp, up 14.8 percent, and Constellation Software Inc, higher by 14.2 percent.

Story continues below advertisement

There were notable decliners as well. Lagging shares were Sierra Wireless Inc, down 26.8 percent, New Gold Inc, down 26.4 percent, and Chemtrade Logistics Income Fund, lower by 19.8 percent.

The most heavily traded shares by volume were Encana Corp, Bombardier Inc and Aurora Cannabis Inc .

The TSX’s energy group rose 1.04 points, or 0.70 percent, while the financials sector slipped 0.36 points, or 0.12 percent.

On Wall Street, the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 103.88 points, or 0.41 percent, to 25,439.39, the S&P 500 lost 7.3 points, or 0.27 percent, to 2,745.73 and the Nasdaq Composite added 6.58 points, or 0.09 percent, to 7,426.96.

MSCI’s gauge of stocks across the globe shed 0.19 percent.

The drop in retail spending in the world’s largest economy heightened investor fears of a global slowdown. Any optimism was further dimmed by data released on Thursday showing an unexpected increase in the number of Americans filing claims for unemployment benefits last week. That pushed the four-week moving average of claims to a one-year high, an indication that job growth was flattening.

“The numbers were a bit of a surprise on the downside and that is critical because this is for December and it suggests that people weren’t spending enough on holiday sales shopping,” said Randy Frederick, vice president of trading and derivatives for Charles Schwab in Austin, Texas.

The sharp fall in spending overshadowed optimism about U.S.-China trade talks and strong earnings from Nestle, drugmaker AstraZeneca and plane giant Airbus.

The euro fell near a three-month low as data showed Germany’s economy stalled in the fourth quarter, with fallout from global trade disputes and Brexit threatening to derail a decade-long expansion in Europe’s economic powerhouse. . That left the dollar near its highest since mid-December against a basket of currencies at 97.059.

Benchmark 10-year U.S. Treasury notes last rose 15/32 in price to yield 2.6518 percent, from 2.706 percent late on Wednesday.

Russian stocks and bonds were also dumped as a rare bipartisan move from U.S. lawmakers proposed stiff new sanctions on Russian government debt, as well as some banks and oil and gas firms.

On China, U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday that trade talks were “going along very well.” Bloomberg said Trump was considering pushing back the March 1 deadline for higher tariffs on Chinese goods by 60 days.

Oil prices found support as top exporter Saudi Arabia said it would cut crude exports and deliver an even deeper output cut.

Story continues below advertisement

U.S. crude gained 1.1 percent to $54.50 per barrel and Brent rose 1.6 percent, to $64.63 per barrel.

“Thanks to healthy oil demand growth and lower OPEC+ production ... we see the market tightening further over the coming months,” UBS analyst Giovanni Staunovo said.

“As such, we continue to expect Brent oil prices will move up to $70–80 a barrel over three to six months.”

Reuters

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter