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The Toronto Stock Exchange and Wall Street fell Friday as the turmoil in Turkey rocked the markets and kept investors on the hunt for safer investments.

The Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX fell 90.47 points, or 0.55 per cent, to 16,326.51, led lower by the health care, consumer staples and utilities sectors. All were lower between 1 to 2 per cent.

Lagging shares were Nuvista Energy Ltd., down 10.7 per cent, Uni-Select Inc, down 6.6 per cent, and Bausch Health Companies Inc., lower by 5.3 per cent.

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Leading the index were Pretium Resources Inc., up 19.4 per cent, Enerflex Ltd., up 9.4 per cent, and Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers Inc, higher by 8.7 per cent.

On the TSX 78 issues advanced and 162 declined as a 0.5-to-1 ratio favoured decliners. There were 9 new highs and 7 new lows, with total volume of 181.0 million shares.

The most heavily traded shares by volume were Bombardier Inc., Aurora Cannabis Inc. and Enbridge Inc.

The TSX’s energy group rose 0.22 points, or 0.11 per cent, while the financials sector slipped 1.81 points, or 0.59 per cent.

The Canadian dollar averaged 76.26 cents US, down 0.43 of a US cent. The loonie slipped despite somewhat positive jobs numbers from Statistics Canada as global investors propped up the U.S. dollar.

Domestic data showed, Canadian economy unexpectedly added 54,100 jobs in July and the unemployment rate dipped to equal a record low of 5.8 per cent.

U.S. stocks slid on Friday as a deepening economic crisis in Turkey dragged on bank shares and triggered a move out of riskier assets.

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The Dow and S&P 500 posted declines for the week following five straight weeks of gains, but the S&P 500 remains just 1.4 per cent below its record high from Jan. 26.

A drop in technology shares added to the day’s bearish tone. The S&P technology index fell 0.8 per cent, with Intel down 2.6 per cent after Goldman Sachs downgraded the stock to “sell.”

Microchip Technology shares fell 10.9 per cent after a disappointing second-quarter revenue forecast.

A slump in the Turkish lira worsened after U.S. President Donald Trump doubled tariffs on steel and aluminum imported from the country.

Investors fled to safe-haven assets, pushing the dollar higher and weighing on U.S. bond yields.

“It was a classic risk-off move,” said Quincy Krosby, chief market strategist at Prudential Financial in New Jersey. “You worry about the collateral damage. You worry about the effects on Europe. You have banks losing because the 10-year U.S. Treasury (yield) came down.”

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The S&P financial index fell 1.2 per cent, among the biggest drags on the S&P 500.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 196.09 points, or 0.77 per cent, to 25,313.14, the S&P 500 lost 20.3 points, or 0.71 per cent, to 2,833.28 and the Nasdaq Composite dropped 52.67 points, or 0.67 per cent, to 7,839.11.

For the week, the Dow fell 0.6 per cent and the S&P 500 dipped 0.3 per cent. The Nasdaq gained 0.3 per cent for the week after strong gains in some technology shares.

Citigroup, the most global of the major U.S. banks, fell 2.4 per cent. JPMorgan, Wells Fargo and Bank of America were also lower.

“Any time that there’s any movement in currencies, financials tend to reap the contagion risks,” said Jamie Cox, managing partner for Harris Financial Group in Richmond, Virginia.

Shares of trade-sensitive companies also declined, including Boeing, 3M and Caterpillar, which were all down at least 1 per cent.

Tesla shares ended up 0.9 per cent. The number of Tesla shares sold short rebounded and are now higher than before Chief Executive Elon Musk on Tuesday proposed taking the electric car maker private, according to data from financial technology and analytics firm S3 Partners.

Data on Friday showed U.S. consumer prices rose in July and the underlying trend continued to strengthen, pointing to a steady increase in inflation pressures.

Declining issues outnumbered advancing ones on the NYSE by a 2.10-to-1 ratio; on Nasdaq, a 1.51-to-1 ratio favoured decliners.

The S&P 500 posted 12 new 52-week highs and 10 new lows; the Nasdaq Composite recorded 87 new highs and 102 new lows.

About 6.7 billion shares changing hands on U.S. exchanges. That compares with the 6.4 billion-share daily average for the past 20 trading days, according to Thomson Reuters data.

Reuters

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