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From the invitations, to the memorabilia, to the young community leaders invited to the marriage of Britain’s Prince Harry and Meghan Markle on May 19, here are some of the preparations.

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Queen Elizabeth’s 33-year-old grandson, Harry, fifth-in-line to the throne, and Ms. Markle, 36, who starred in the U.S. TV legal drama “Suits,” will marry at Windsor Castle. Here they watch team trials for the Invictus Games Sydney 2018 at the University of Bath. The Invictus Games, founded by Harry, is the only international sports event for wounded, injured and sick servicemen and women.

Frank Augstein/The Associated Press

The couple has chosen New York-based fashion photographer Alexi Lubomirski as their wedding photographer. Mr. Lubomirski also did the couple’s engagement photos, and he is a former assistant to Mario Testino, who was famed for his photos of Harry’s mother, the late Diana, Princess of Wales.

HANDOUT/Reuters

The bride-to-be alone is forecast to pump US$210-million into the British economy as consumers try to mimic her style, according to economists at Brand Finance. On Christmas Day, Ms. Markle wore a camel alpaca coat produced by Canadian fashion designer Bojana Sentaler. The “Meghan effect” was almost instantaneous as the coat sold out.

Alastair Grant/The Associated Press

Self-taught London floral designer Philippa Craddock will create the church flower arrangements. A lemon elderflower cake that will incorporate the bright flavours of spring will be made by pastry chef Claire Ptak, who was raised in California and now owns London-based bakery Violet Cakes.

Dominic Lipinski/The Associated Press

Six hundred guests are being invited to the wedding ceremony, as St. George’s Chapel has a capacity of 800 people. Kensington Palace said it is not necessary for the royal couple to invite world leaders and politicians to their wedding because Harry is not a direct heir to the throne. (That means the Obamas, the Trumps and apparently even Prime Minister Theresa May have not been invited.)

POOL/Reuters

Faith Dickinson, a fifteen-year-old from Peterborough, Ont., has scored an invitation. She is one of 1,200 members of the public invited to the grounds of Windsor Castle to celebrate the marriage. She met both Harry and his older brother William when she received the Diana Award in London last spring for setting up the charity Cuddles for Cancer when she was nine years old. The non-profit organization makes fleece blankets for cancer patients and soldiers living with PTSD.

/The Canadian Press

In deciding to limit the attendees to close friends and family, the couple is keeping things low key. Similarly, instead of wedding gifts large or small, the couple would prefer that donations be made to charities. Here, memorabilia on offer in the tourist shops of Windsor, west of London.

TOLGA AKMEN/Getty Images

“The couple have chosen charities which represent a range of issues that they are passionate about, including sport for social change, women’s empowerment, conservation, the environment, homelessness, HIV and the Armed Forces,” Kensington Palace said. The Myna Mahila Foundation, an Indian charity championing menstrual hygiene, is one of the organizations to benefit from Prince Harry and Ms. Markle's wedding, its head said.

INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/Getty Images

More Royal wedding memorabilia for sale in a gift shop in Windsor.

DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images

In honour of the nuptials, “Harry & Meghan’s Windsor Knot” has been brewed to give the traditional British pint a U.S. twist. The pale ale is made from barley grown in Windsor’s royal farm, to represent Harry, and combined with hops from the west coast of the United States, reflecting Ms. Markle’s heritage.

PETER NICHOLLS/Reuters

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