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As recently as a few years ago, searching for eco-conscious gifts would have netted a small number of finds that were, for the most part, more granola than glam. Fast-forward to today, and the options for sustainable yet dazzling buys seem endless, from outerwear made from plastic bottles to small-batch sparkling wine to waste-free razor kits. The green benefits of these finds aren’t just marketing spin, either, thanks to shopper demand for transparency and genuine change. To help you tackle your holiday wish list, we’ve compiled 100 stylish presents and broken down why you’ll feel good about giving and receiving them this season.

Fashion

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1. AIYE’s first collection is rooted in and created using a rare lustrous straw grown in northern Brazil. Sustainable production of each piece is reflective of that year’s crop without exceeding the yield of the harvest season. AIYE Vera sun hat, $330 through shopaiye.com.

2. Recycled yellow gold and ethically sourced stones are central to Hania Kuzbari’s statement jewellery. Blue Sapphire Horseshoe necklace, $1,039 through haniakuzbari.com.

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3. Nadaam uses ethically sourced Mongolian cashmere in durable loungewear that is produced with 100-per-cent clean energy. Naadam cashmere shawl-collar robe, $550 at Hudson’s Bay.

4. 18 Waits’s wool knits are handcrafted on antique Swiss looms in Prince Edward Island, using Douglas fir buttons and hand-sewn leather elbow patches. 18 Waits knit cardigan in ‘Mist’ Saddleworth wool, $395 at 18 Waits.

5. A slam dunk for fleece fans, this pullover is made from 100-per-cent recycled-polyester printed polar fleece and comes with a lifetime guarantee. Hearth fleece pullover in deep teal/purple velvet, $129.99 at Burton.

6. These surreal drop earrings not only make a statement, but they are made from recycled silver and conflict-free stones in Los Angeles. Leigh Miller earrings, US$280 through netaporter.com.

7. Montreal-based tights brand Rachel offers repair techniques and second life ideas for its products, while transforming its own waste into hair elastics. Rachel warm black white polka-dot tights, $24.50, and burgundy semi-sheer chevron tights, $17 through fromrachel.com.

8. Old jeans never really have to die thanks to Frank And Oak’s circular denim production cycle that utilizes post-consumer waste in its stylish new collection. The Nina wide-leg jean in light indigo, $89.50 at Frank And Oak.

9. The Cambodian production facility for this Australian denim brand is a hub for sustainable employment and training for women, all while using less water and energy in the construction of its stylish pieces. Outland Denim Abigail jean in black, $235 through outlanddenim.ca.

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10. Woodpecker is a vegan, cruelty-free winter coat alternative and uses Sustans – the only bio-based high technological material for insulation available – in its Canadian-made outerwear. Woodpecker Men’s Woody bomber, $750 through woodpeckercoats.com.

11. This understated set of trinkets is handmade in Montreal using in-house produced pewter. Anne Marie Chagnon Madisson Earrings, $44 at Simons.

12. Quality staples never go out of style, and this classic sweatshirt is made using soft premium cotton purchased directly from Egyptian farmers at a 35-per-cent premium. Essentials sweatshirt, $68 at Kotn.

13. A pair of socks embroidered with a mermaid motif are made in family-owned, certified sustainable factories and mills in Portugal and Spain. Desmond and Dempsey Sombrero socks, $28 at Holt Renfrew.

14. This stylish parka, made from post-consumer plastic, prevented 45 water bottles from going into a landfill. Norden Mia puffer, $375 through nordenproject.com.

15. Aldo’s first sustainable collection of sneakers is made from algae foam and recycled water bottles. RPPL sneakers, $90 at Aldo.

16. BonLook’s Made in Canada frame collection is produced with the support of Fellow Earthlings, an eyewear company founded and based in Prince Edward Island. Bonlook Flora sunglasses, starting at $225 at Bonlook.

17. Vancouver brand Sonya Lee sources its leathers from food production cycles and uses vegetable tanning to minimize the depletion of natural resources. Sonya Lee Victoria bag with emerald handle, $517 through sonyalee.co.

18. Montreal-based Daveed is the first luxury leather bag brand to achieve Certified B Corporation status, and its ultrachic accessories are built to stand the test of time. Daveed travel duffle in chestnut, $795 through daveed.co.

19. Loewe’s limited edition mini beaded elephant bag is produced alongside the Samburu Workshop artisan collective in Kenya, with all proceeds going to support the Elephant Crisis Fund. Loewe X Knot On My Planet limited-edition elephant mini bag, $2,300 at Holt Renfrew.

20. Hotel Motel’s unisex leatherwear is produced locally in Montreal, using mineral tanning and vegetable retanning. Hotel Motel Taco belt bag, $120 at Simons.

Beauty

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1. Cult beauty brand Rodin is built around the sort of clean, natural extracts featured in this ultraluxurious body oil, infused with hyaluronic acid. Rodin Olio Lusso Mermaid Collection Luxury Body Oil, $120 at Jacob and Sebastian.

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2. Bastide’s “beauty artisans” work in eco-certified French labs using more than 90-per-cent ingredients of natural origin to create each product. Bastide Figue d’Ete potpourri-scented crystals, $105 at Holt Renfrew.

3. Warm notes of sandalwood, amber and vetiver are combined in this clean and cruelty-free fragrance by heritage French perfumer, Maison Louis Marie. Maison Louis Marie No.04 Bois de Balincourt perfume, $75 at Sephora.

4. Crafted in small batches on Bowen Island, B.C., Sangre De Fruta is an eco-conscious alternative to luxury skin and hair care, with botanical formulas that are biodegradable, eco-friendly and cruelty-free. Sangre De Fruta Botanical shampoo and conditioner, $72 each through sangredefruta.com.

5. Kiehl’s soaps are derived from natural, sustainably sourced ingredients, and packaged in responsible, festive wraps. Limited edition scented scrub soaps, $15 each at Kiehl’s.

6. Clean-beauty pioneer Tarte works directly with rainforest cooperatives to sustainably harvest ingredients such as Amazonian clay, which are used in this stackable, shimmering cheek palette. 9 Ways To Shine Cheek Wardrobe, $45 at Sephora.

7. Vancouver Candle Co. pays tribute to various locales across Canada using ethically sourced materials as well as premium soy wax, a carbon neutral alternative to coconut wax, which is a leading cause of deforestation. Vancouver Candle Co. West Coast candle, $42 at vancouvercandleco.com.

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8. This luxurious face mask, by green beauty hero Tata Harper, is formulated with 13 all-natural floral extracts and hyaluronic acid to nourish, hydrate and sooth redness. Tata Harper Hydrating Floral Mask, $119 at Holt Renfrew.

9. The Laundress’s plant-derived cleaning formulas are built to combat environmentally harmful washing techniques such as dry cleaning by tackling tricky stains and delicate fabrics. The Laundress stain removal kit, $52.58 through shopbop.com.

10. Toronto cult beauty brand, F.Miller, uses a 100-per-cent natural formula that is biodegradable in the range of high-performing oils sampled in this kit. F.Miller Necessity Kit, $145 through fmillerskincare.com.

11. Inspired by the English coastline, this scent sampler uses sustainably sourced, all-natural ingredients from its five namesake locales. Haeckels GPS Parfum Exploration Set, $79 through goodeeworld.com.

12. Céla’s skincare and scrubs are inspired by and made in Canada, using natural ingredients such as sustainably grown Abyssinian oil, which absorbs quickly and works as a barrier against dehydration. Céla Seed to Skin scrub, $42, and Black Gold coffee scrub, $46 at thisiscela.com.

13. Made from unbleached organic hemp, these blotting papers double as rolling papers. EvioSkin x Aurora Roll + Blot Papers, $13.50 at eviobeauty.com.

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14. Biodegradable, certified organic formulas have a place in men’s grooming, too, such as in this beard kit by Ontario-based Cocoon Apothecary. Cocoon Apothecary beard grooming kit, $40 through cocoonapothecary.ca.

15. This premium soy-wax candle will bloom with peony, rose and spice, and then biodegrade so the glass can be recycled. Peoni Petals candle, $36 through jbskinguru.com.

16. Indie Lee’s well-loved formulas including the CoQ-10 toner are clean, vegan and just as powerful as their chemical competitors. Indie Lee CoQ-10 Toner, $44 at Jacob and Sebastian.

17. Toronto’s Bare Market mails loose, bulk product – such as this all-natural dry shampoo made from arrowroot powder, clay, bamboo leaf and essential oils – using paper bags and reused boxes to ensure zero-waste shipping. Green + Frugal dry shampoo, $22.05 for 250 grams through baremarket.ca.

18. Well Kept offers a zero-waste alternative to disposable razors with plastic-free packaging, recyclable blades, a solid brass handle and a lineup of all-natural shaving soaps and oils. Well Kept safety razor set, $104 through keepwellkept.com.

19. Help skin feel refreshed and soft all winter with Wildcraft’s mineral-rich, all-natural exfoliant for the face and body. It is handcrafted in Toronto. Wildcraft face and body scrub, $20 at wildcraftcare.ca.

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20. Just in time for dry skin season, this kit of foot salves and a s is naturally sourced and Canadian-made. Inspired Soap Works Foot Rescue Kit, $50 through inspiredsoapworks.com.

Food and Drink

1. This whisk, designed for at-home matcha making, is made from a single piece of bamboo with 100 prongs for clump-free mixtures. Chalait tea bamboo whisk, $22 through goop.com.

2. Drizzle’s raw honeys are inventive, delicious and are sourced through Canadian beekeepers. Drizzle honeycomb, $27.99 through drizzlehoney.com.

3. This minimal teapot is made from natural, recycled porcelain and oak. Skagerak Nordic teapot, $225 through goodeeworld.com.

4. LARQ insulated bottles are temperature controlled, self-cleaning and rechargeable, so there’s truly no need to ever use a plastic one again. LARQ Self Cleaning Water Bottle, $125 at Indigo.

5. The recycled fabric of a heavily used tent this apron is made from imbues it with character – and durability. Puebco vintage tent fabric apron, $46 through puebco.ca.

6. Beau’s, the first-ever certified B-Corp brewery in Canada, has teamed up with David’s Tea for this tasty infusion of craft beer and organic cream of earl grey. Beau’s Davids Tea London Fog, $3.65 at the LCBO in Ontario, $3.89 in Quebec.

7. Linen is naturally biodegradable, and these napkins are dyed using water-based inks to ensure their sustainable future. Linen napkins, $38.23/pair through banquet.etsy.ca.

8. Earthology’s adorable reusable food wraps use sustainably harvested beeswax from small independent beekeepers, while reducing the use of wasteful alternatives. Earthology beeswax food wrap 3 wrap variety pack, $25 through earthologywraps.com.

9. A sparkling wine is always a safe bet at holiday time, and this crisp, fruity Riesling was made in small batches and without the use of pesticides in Beamsville, Ont. Kew Vineyards 2017 organic sparkling Riesling, $19.95 at the LCBO in Ontario.

10. Saul Good Gift Co. only works with local vendors within a day’s drive of its offices in Vancouver and Toronto, ensuring minimal environmental footprint and an investment in local business. What’s more: no cellophane is harmed in the making of their baskets. The Charlatan gift basket, $80 through Saul Good Gift Co.

11. This family-owned Santa Maria, Calif., vineyard has been sustainably farming its crops for more than 30 years, resulting in this ripe pinot noir with notes of black raspberry, blueberry, cranberry and pomegranate. Cambria Julia’s Vineyard Pinot Noir, $34.95 at the LCBO in Ontario (lcbo.com), $413.28/case of 12 through Halpern Enterprises.

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12. This gift set harnesses the benefits of organic, GMO-free hemp and is made locally in Quebec. Maison d’Herbes Hemp oil and hearts set, $19.99 at Simons.

13. Spirit of York’s vodka is made from Ontario rye in the heart of downtown Toronto. Spirit of York Vodka, $49.95 at the LCBO in Ontario and Spirit of York distillery.

14. Artisanal tonic syrup offers a unique, refined flavour and is made with natural ingredients in Montreal. 3/4 oz. maison tonic syrup, $25.95 at Cocktail Emporium.

15. For those whose love of Scotch knows no bounds, these single-malt infused toothpicks are made from North American birch wood, with 100 trees planted for each cut. Daneson naturally flavoured toothpicks in Single Malt No. 16, $15 through fendrihan.ca.

16. Small-batch, single origin Canadian maple syrup will sweeten things up at Boxing Day brunch. Sweetbark maple syrup, $21.95 at Holt Renfrew.

17. Kendall Jackson boasts the largest solar generator in the wine industry, helping to earn it sustainable certification from California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance. Kendall Jackson Vintner’s Reserve Chardonnay, $21.95 at the LCBO in Ontario and additional retailers across Canada.

18. This inventive vinaigrette trio is bottled in Quebec City using Canadian ingredients such as Labrador tea, seaweed and leeks. Lokko Les Classiques vinaigrette trio, $30 at Simons.

19. Not only is this a rare clam-free alternative to Caesar mix, but it’s also Canadian-made, using only premium all-natural ingredients. Walter All-Natural Vegan Craft Caesar Mix, $6.95 at Cocktail Emporium.

20. British tea brand Teapigs uses biodegradable mesh bags and plastic-free packaging to case its premium teas, such as limited-edition holiday blends: chocolate orange, spiced pear and Gluhwein. Teapigs limited-edition holiday teas, $7.99 each through teapigs.ca.

21. This versatile pot is perfect for displaying gourmet salts and is handmade in Lac-Mégantic, Que., using local wood and marble. Atelier Bussière Fogo pot, $55 at Simons.

22. California-based brand Xicama harvests jicama in Sayulita, Mexico, for its inventive cocktail mixes, and uses the excess to create a gluten-free flour. Xicamix three pack, US$19.99 through xicamalife.com.

23. B.C.’s Sheringham Distillery crafts its gin from locally sourced barley, natural botanicals and hand harvested local winged kelp. Sheringham Distillery Seaside gin, $39.91 through sheringham-distillery.myshopify.com.

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24. Ms. Better’s bitters are made with local and organic ingredients in Vancouver, resulting in their perfectly ripe flavour. Ms. Better’s Cucumber Bitters, $28 at Cocktail Emporium.

25. O.Vine is a light and crisp alcohol-free alternative to wine, created using upcycled wine grape skins from Israel’s Galil Mountain Winery. O.Vine Essence Water, $6.99 at Pusateri’s.

26. Raaka makes chocolate from scratch, with traceable, high-quality, single-origin cacao. The results also happen to be delicious. Raaka assorted chocolate bars, $10.99 each at Pusateri’s.

27. Etsy offsets all of the carbon emissions generated from shipping of products such as these all natural, linen placemats. Linen Placemats, $25 through confettimill.etsy.com.

28. This roomy canvas tote is perfect for carrying groceries and was constructed from a single piece of cotton fabric to reduce off-cut waste. Baggu canvas market tote, $58 at Indigo.

29. Eco-friendly sponge cloths are a great alternative to paper towel and biodegradable. Ten & Co. Swedish dish cloth, $6.99 through baremarket.ca.

30. Part gag gift, part local treasure chest, this Jelly of the Month gift set is inspired by the film, National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation, and comes with 35 jams and jellies made by Niagara-on-the-Lake’s famed Greaves Jams. Jelly of the Month Club Gift Set, $44 through retrofestive.ca.

Home and Design

1. Zahava’s candelabras are hand cast and made with single-source 10-karat gold. Zahava medium brass candelabra, $115 at Holt Renfrew.

2. Handmade in Montreal using lightweight high-quality birch plywood, these wooden record dividers will keep the classics alphabetized in style. Atelier-D Handmade Wooden Record Dividers $100 through atelier-d.ca.

3. Sustainable Lego… who knew? This elaborate tree house uses more than 180 botanical elements made from plant-based polyethylene plastic using sustainably sourced sugarcane and boasts the highest number of sustainable bricks used in one set. Lego Ideas Tree House, $269.99 at Lego.

4. Vancouver-based Mala the Brand’s candles and packaging are fully recyclable, and with every purchase a tree is planted in North America. Plus, they’re fun. The Cereal candle’s citrus, lemon and berry notes will take you back to sweet Saturday mornings of your youth. Cereal candle, $27 through malathebrand.com.

5. This chic set of sheets is breathable, insulating and made from flax, a highly sustainable fibre grown without the use of pesticides. Flax Sleep queen flax set in olive, $490 through flaxsleep.com.

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6. Peru-based D.A.R. Projects is a sustainable artisan studio crafting everyday objects, such as this chic planter, from Andean stone. D.A.R. Projects Oval Ocean Planter, $125 at the Art Gallery of Ontario.

7. This sculptural tote could double as an art piece. Designed and made in Toronto from materials sourced in Canada and the U.S., using knit technologies that minimizes textile waste. Exhale Supernova bag, $268 at Hoi bo.

8. A candle duo is made from pure beeswax with a cotton wick, and is shaped and twisted by hand in Pheonix, Ariz. Cala Lily candles, $45 at 100% Silk.

9. YYY founder Merida Anderson crafts each of her clever ceramic pieces by hand in Montreal, without the use of moulds. Peach speckled bowl, $60 through yyycollection.com.

10. Cambie’s vibrant rugs are made from sheep’s wool. Surquillo rug, $195 at Cambie.

11. Made on traditional jacquard looms and hand-finished in the U.S. by skilled artisans, this cushion is fashioned from naturally sourced cotton. Viso Tapestry Pillow 13, $133 through goodeeworld.com.

12. This soft, reversible throw is ethically made in Canada using baby alpaca yarn that is naturally coloured. Blacksaw Midnight Sun reversible throw, $498 at Holt Renfrew.

13. Handcrafted in India by the makers of Asha Handicrafts Association, which provides benefits to more than 6,500 artisans including medical care and educational scholarships, this ornament will be the star of your tree. Felt llama ornament, $12 at Ten Thousand Villages.

14. Toronto’s Coolican and Company has teamed up with Paris-based Canadian designer, Calla, on this collection of stools made with sustainably sourced white oak and recycled, hand-woven fabric. Coolican and Company x Calla Marrakesh Marrakesh stool, $989 by special order through coolicanandcompany.com.

15. As well as crafting heirloom quality pieces from natural, locally sourced materials, Rekindle partners with One Tree Planted, a reforestation organization based in Vermont. Rekindle Arenal match striker, $39 through rekindleyourlife.ca.

16. Made in Canada using vegetable-based ink and recycled paper, this cute craft wrapping paper is fully compostable. Craft wrapping paper, $9.95 at Lee Valley.

17. Hebron Glass is a family-run studio crafting marbled vessels in the West Bank using recycled glass and local mineral additives. Phoenician Glass Vase, $80 at 100% Silk.

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18. Bamboo is a fast-growing, renewable alternative to plastic. These cute cactus-print containers sub in for Tupperware. Cactus Print Bamboo food storage vessels, $7.99/set of three at HomeSense.

Travel

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1. Gold-hued cocktail straws add a layer of glitz to any soiree. Vitski stainless-steel cocktail straws, $30/set of four through goop.com.

2. Take your sake to go. This carafe is made from titanium, a 100-per-cent recyclable eco metal. Snow Peak titanium sake carafe, $264.95 at MEC.

3. This airplane-ready scarf can be worn in a myriad of ways and is made from a blend of Modal, Rayon, Lycra and cotton. Encircled Wrap Up Scarf, $98 through encircled.ca.

4. Matter Company’s trio of therapeutic essential oil rollers will treat nausea, stress and pain with all-natural essential oils such as eucalyptus, frankincense and lemon. Set of three essential oil rollers, $67 through mattercompany.com.

5. This sleep mask and scrunchie kit from Toronto-based loungewear brand Soft Focus uses leftover fabric from its plant-based and locally produced loungewear. Soft Focus sleep mask and scrunchie set, $68 through insoftfocus.com.

6. For those who love to soak on the go, Gold Apothecary’s carry-on-friendly bath salts are made from high quality, plant-based essential oil blends, herbs and extracts. Gold Apothecary bath salt travel trio, $32 through goldapothecary.com.

7. This BPA-free, melamine dish set is made of recycled materials and light enough to pack for a day hike or picnic. Puebco melamine meal kit, $38 through puebco.ca.

8. Caudalie’s elixir is all-natural, boxless and TSA approved for a quick refresh while in transit. Caudalie Beauty Elixr, $59 through caudalie.com.

9. Puebco’s nomadic bed (read: portable mattress) is made using a military-grade canvas that has been woven from recycled cotton. Puebco Navy Nomadic Bed, $268 through puebco.ca.

10. United by Blue removes one pound of trash from our world’s oceans and waterways for every product sold, such as this durable water bottle made from sustainable materials. United by Blue insulated steel bottle, $49.95 at MEC.

11. For those who abide by carry-on only, Away’s compact suitcases are made from recyclable polycarbonate, the leftovers of which are reused by the brand’s suppliers. Away Limited Edition Luminous Holiday Collection The Carry-On in Jade, $325 through awaytravel.com.

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12. Ebby Rane’s popular overnight bag has been reimagined in sustainable cork and vegan leather and is made at a female-owned factory in Colombia. Ebby Rane Valise bag, US$325 through ebbyrane.com.

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