Skip to main content

There's no shortage of very, very rich people with a taste for bridge. Warren Buffett and Bill Gates are both avid bridge players, for instance. And many wealthy players around the world will pay to sponsor professionals to get them on their teams to win tournaments or simply to enjoy a game with them.

Janet de Botton, the widow of a Swiss financier estimated to be worth more than $457-million, is perhaps the most well known sponsor in Britain, says Michael Gold, online manager of Bridge4Money.com, a British-based website.

"She plays bridge virtually every day of her life and she sponsors her own team," Mr. Gold says. "She will hire the best players whatever it costs."

Story continues below advertisement

In 2007, Ms. de Botton led England's bridge team to victory in the Chairman's Cup, a prestigious tournament held in Sweden.

In Italy, Maria Teresa Lavazza, wife of the owner of the Lavazza coffee company, pays salaries to top bridge players on her team, Mr. Gold says. In 2005 she sponsored a team that won the Cavendish Invitational, a high-profile tournament in Las Vegas.

Wealthy sponsors may be looking to win bragging rights, but they are also likely after the thrill of competition.

"It's impossible to describe to a non-bridge player how awesome it is to compete at the top level of bridge," says Gavin Wolpert, a Florida-based bridge professional.



Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter