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Gold medalist in the women's snowboard slopestyle Jamie Anderson of the United States smiles during the medals ceremony at the 2014 Winter Olympics, Sunday, Feb. 9, 2014, in Sochi, Russia. ‘Tinder in the Olympic Village is next level,’ she says

Morry Gash/The Associated Press

Love is in the air at the Sochi Winter Olympics this Valentine's Day.

Us magazine reports that romance abounds at the Olympic Village as many of the competing athletes hook up using the dating app known as Tinder.

"Tinder in the Olympic Village is next level," American snowboarder Jamie Anderson said this week. "It's all athletes! In the mountain village it's all athletes. It's hilarious. There are some cuties on there."

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Launched in late 2012, the Tinder app sorts users by location and then allows them to scan through photos to set up private text communications.

Think of it as virtual speed-dating.

And with nearly 3,000 athletes competing in Sochi, the Tinder dating pool is considerable and the temptation to spend hours scanning all those buff cuties is omnipresent.

Which is exactly the reason why Anderson, 23, said she deleted the app in the days before her event.

"There was a point where I had to be, like, okay, this is way too distracting," she said. "I deleted my account to focus on the Olympics."

So far, steering clear of Tinder appears to have worked for Anderson: She collected a gold medal in the women's slopestyle snowboard event on Sunday. The athlete declined to say whether she'd reload the app now that she's finished her event.

Other athletes with their eyes on the prize forced themselves to make that pre-emptive dating strike: U.S. snowboarder Sage Kotsenburg, winner of the gold medal in the men's slopestyle event, said he was well aware of Tinder's siren call before the torch was even lit for the Sochi Games.

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"I deleted it before I went," he said.

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