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STRANGE BUT TRUE

Jon Stewart confirms NBC really did try to hire him to host the venerable news program Meet the Press.

And the wiseacre host of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart's response to the offer: Seriously?

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"My guess is they were casting as wide and as weird a net as they could," said Stewart in a new Rolling Stone interview. "I'm sure part of them was thinking, 'Why don't we just make it a variety show?'"

Three weeks ago, reports trickled out that Stewart was seriously pursued by NBC earlier this year to helm Meet the Press, the Sunday-morning news and interview program that began on radio in 1947 and has been previously hosted by Tim Russert, Tom Brokaw and other TV news luminaries.

In the Rolling Stone interview, the 51-year-old Stewart says he never seriously considered the job.

"I felt like that was one of those situations where someone says, 'We really like what you do. Why don't you come over here and do something different, maybe something you don't do as well, for us?'"

At the same time, Stewart appears to have been flattered by the offer.

"I can understand notionally where it comes from," he said. "News and entertainment have melded in a way. But they would be overcompensating on the entertainment side. That's certainly not an outlandish decision, although I don't necessarily think that's the best direction for it."

SIGNING OFF

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The Colbert Report will air its final episode on December 18. Colbert made the announcement on Thursday's broadcast along with a pitch for the paperback release of his book America Again: Re-becoming the Greatness We Never Weren't. "Stephen Colbert, the guy you've seen here every night for nine years will be gone. All you'll have left of me is this book," said the host while holding up the paperback. "So pick up American Again for a loved one. Or for a hated one." Colbert is scheduled to take over for David Letterman on The Late Show in late 2015.

Source: Hollywood Reporter

TRICK AND TREAT

Katy Perry is getting rave reviews for her innovative Halloween costume. The Roar singer attended Kate Hudson's annual Halloween bash in Hollywood on Thursday night attired as a giant Flamin' Hot Cheeto. To assume the guise of the snack food, Perry wore a full-body orange covering with a face-hole cutout, orange tights and shoes, and carried an authentic Cheetos bag to collect her Halloween loot. At the same event, actress Jessica Alba showed up dressed as Guns N' Roses guitarist Slash and Adam Sandler came as a pirate.

Source: MTV

MULTI-TASKING MOMS

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Working mothers appear to be more productive than their childless peers. A new study from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis analyzed research from more than 10,000 academic economists to determine the connection between parenting and productivity of both male and female employees over a three-decade career. Among men, fathers of one child and those without children performed similarly for most of their careers, while men with two or more children were more productive than either group. Among the female group, it was determined that women working mothers steadfastly outperformed women without children in the workplace – and mothers with two children were the most productive of all. At the same time, the research indicated that among women with young children, there was a 15 to 17 per cent dip in work productivity.

Source: Washington Post

ON THE FLIP SIDE

Funny or Die has released a parody version of the viral video showing a woman being harassed on the streets of New York. Earlier this week, the anti-street harassment group Hollaback! released the video titled 10 Hours of Walking in NYC as a Woman, in which actress Shoshana Roberts was the subject of more than 100 unsolicited catcalls from male admirers. As of Friday, the video had received more than 22-million views on YouTube. In the Funny or Die parody, an unidentified white male treads the streets of New York and receives a steady succession of high-fives, job offers and even a Starbucks gift card.

Source: Slate

THE ALLURE OF NICE

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If you want people to find you more attractive, try being a good person. A new study published on ScienceDirect.com has concluded that a person's behaviour correlates to how they're perceived by society. Researchers tasked 120 Chinese university students to rate the attractiveness of 60 unfamiliar female faces, which produced consistent ratings among the respondents. Two weeks later, researchers brought the same volunteers back to show them the same faces – except this time they provided some of the students with positive attributes about the women in the photos and told the others that the same women were mean or evil. Those students who believed they were looking at kind and decent women rated those faces as more attractive than the students who believed the women were less than virtuous.

Source: New York Magazine

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