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Can a face powder make you a happier person? Add to ...

Physicians Formula Happy Booster Glow & Mood Boosting Powder

The promise

Stimulate happiness and well being on the outside as well as the inside with Physicians Formula's lightweight and airy powder. Containing the brand's exclusive Happy Boost Blend of cheerful design and happy scent, the colour, texture and aroma combine to deliver a therapeutic boost of happiness along with flawless radiance and a natural flush of colour.

How it works

Mood-enhancing elements include a "happy heart" design in a complementary palette of tones as well as a cute pink and red compact with a fan-shaped "happy booster brush." Skin-uplifting ingredients include Happy Skin (a natural plant extract that is derived from Arctic Rose and gives a sense of wellness and pleasure), Euphoryl (an anti-depressant rich in omega 3), Murumuru Seed Butter and Theobroma Grandiflorum Seed Butter (to provide a silky-smooth feel while increasing skin's luminosity) and fresh violet notes that invigorate mood. The powder is also hypoallergenic, paraben-free and non-comedogenic.

How to use it

Blend all shades together and brush the powder evenly over the face and neck. For an extra pop of colour, sweep the brush over the pink heart and apply to the cheeks. It can be worn alone or over makeup.

The bottom line

These are some of the craziest, most asinine claims I've ever come across from a cosmetics company. A natural plant extract called Happy Skin? Smushed-up Omega-3-rich anti-depressants? A mood-enhancing design? Well, at least they're committing to the crazy. The only way this powder may chemically alter your mood is if you suck it up into a syringe and inject it directly into your veins. And even then, I doubt it. I'll tell you this much: Applying it to my skin didn't make me nearly as happy as reading the back of the box. That made me hysterically happy - gut-busting giggles, belly-aching guffaws, tears-of-laughter happy. In other words: It works! But not really.

$19.99 at drugstores and mass-market retailers nationwide.

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