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The product

Essence of argan oil

The promise

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Known as "liquid gold," this 100-per cent organic and fair-trade Moroccan argan oil boasts anti-aging and natural healing properties. It is sourced from Berbers in the North African country and is credited with helping to repair damaged hair, reducing wrinkles and acne, diminishing the appearance of age spots and healing dry scalp and diaper rash.

How it works

Argan oil is lauded for being naturally rich in antioxidants, essential fatty acids, carotenoids, ferulic acid, sterols, polyphenols, vitamin E and squalene. Together, these elements help to heal skin, reduce inflammation and fend off free radicals. It is available in 15-, 30- and 50-millilitre sizes.

How to use it

Apply to any area of the body to relieve dryness, itchiness, inflammation or any other skin, hair or nail ailment.

The bottom line

For me, overexposure is akin to a death knell: As far as I'm concerned, Gwyneth Paltrow is a ghost of the past, cupcakes belong six feet under and the word "obsessed" should be put out to lexicographic pasture.

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And with every new beauty product seemingly boasting argan oil as its star ingredient, it too was going the way of the dodo in my books.

So when I decided to throw this product into the battle ring with my dry, cracked, winter-ravaged heels and elbows (an ongoing losing battle, I might add), I was sure I would emerge quite smug, armed with the evidence that argan oil isn't a cure-all and ready to bury it along with Gwyneth. What I found instead were fast-absorbing, ultra-moisturizing properties that left smooth, supple heels and elbows in their wake – not to mention a chastened understanding that sometimes overexposure is justified.

I'm, like, obsessed with it.

From $44.99 through www.essenceofargan.com.

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