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Party photos of the week: Agent Provocateur opening, Gallery Hop Gala and IDSwest launch

Agent Provocateur opening, Toronto

Naughty knickers were cause for celebration on Sept. 17 as Agent Provocateur, the British luxury lingerie maker, opened its first Canadian stand-alone store in Toronto. Founded in 1994 by Joseph Corré, son of British fashion designer and activist Vivienne Westwood and fashion– and music-business rebel Malcolm McLaren, the company is now run by CEO Garry Hogarth, who was on hand for the launch party in an embroidered Balmain jacket. Equal parts boudoir and brothel in style, the new store features lacquered surfaces in soft pink and black, plush black wall-towall carpeting and Hollywood Regency fixtures to display the barely there, after-after-hours wear. Fashion-show producer Paola Fullerton, stylist Amarsana Gendunova, interior designer Michelle Lloyd-Bermann and Hal Jackman Foundation director Victoria Jackman all perused the goods, while Hannah Bronfman, visiting from New York, was on DJ duty.

Amarsana Gendunova. Photos by Nolan Bryant for The Globe and Mail.

Catherine Nugent.

Michelle Lloyd-Bermann.

Agent Provocateur CEO Garry Hogarth.

Guests greet Amanda Blakely’s plus one.

Hannah Bronfman.

Jane Apor.

Jenna Bitove Naumovich.

Gallery Hop Gala and auction, Toronto

On Sept. 18, the Canadian Art Foundation’s Gallery Hop Gala and Auction, now in its 19th year, returned to its downtown roots for a gala fundraiser and auction at Kool Haus in Toronto. The usual suburban club kids with a fondness for thumping beats and mind-altering elements were replaced with cocktails, video installations and philanthropists with a habit of their own: contemporary Canadian art. The stage, usually reserved for international DJs, was the domain of Waddington’s Stephen Ranger, who loaned his comical approach to the art of auctioneering to raise funds in support of the Canadian Art Foundation’s programming initiatives and commitment to keeping audiences across Canada engaged with art. CAF co-chair Kimberley Bozak, Gallery girl Jane Halverson-Vendittelli and husband Bruno Vendittelli, AGO board member Carol Rapp, Galen Weston Jr. and wife Alexandra, philanthropist Emmanuelle Gattuso, Nancy Lockhart and the artists Wanda Koop, Rundi Phelan and Amanda Clyne were among the many in attendance.

From left, Jill Birch, CEO of the Canadian Art Foundation and publisher of Canadian Art magazine, with artist Wanda Koop. Photos by Christina Gapic

Emmanuelle Gattuso, left, and Nancy Lockhart.

Jane Halverson-Vendittelli with husband Bruno Vendittelli.

From left, gala executive committee members Raphaela Dunlap, Jennifer Kerbel Poirer and Catherine Murray.

Dramatic lighting illuminates revellers at Kool Haus. Photo by Nolan Bryant for The globe and mail.

IDSwest launch party, Vancouver

The Vancouver Convention Centre was the place to be on Sept. 25 as 5,000 West Coast design enthusiasts gathered for The Party on Opening Night, an event to mark the 10th edition of IDSwest, the three-day design show highlighting the best of Western Canada’s design innovations. The Very Hush Hush Trailer, Tracy Fillion and Cathy Terepocki’s retrofitted Airstream that’s part gallery, part travelling retail shop offering the work of indie B.C. designers, made a stop at the show, while Montauk Sofa went mad for plaid with an Instagram-worthy concept space covered completely in tartan (accordingly, Montauk’s designer-in-chief, Danny Chartier, donned a kilt perfectly matched to the surrounding space). Effervescence, a 25-foot-tall light installation by Matthew McCormick, was commissioned for the Bottega Gold VIP lounge, a space that saw appearances by designers including Alda Pereira, Peter Wilds, Robert Bailey and Gillian Segal.

Design grande dame Martha Sturdy. Photos courtesy of IDSwest

Sculptor Marie Khouri.

Tristin Rogerson, left, and designer Hailee Christiansen.

Designer Angela Robinson.

Architect Michael Green.

Lighting designer Matthew McCormick.

Montauk Sofa’s Danny Chartier and Leonie Hoerster of Procreation Design Works.

Shannon Heth and IDSwest show director David Tyldesley.

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