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What does Chanel have planned for fall? Equal parts Bombay and Paris

Chanel's Metiers D'Art show is a collection of fall designs, arriving in-store before the main ready-to-wear line. Designer Karl Lagerfeld infused the outfits with equal parts Bombay and Paris

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Chanel’s Metiers D’Art is a collection of fall designs, arriving in-store before the main ready-to-wear line. Mostly, this is an occasion for Karl Lagerfeld to showcase the skillful craftspeople he works with. Metiers D’Art approximates couture as far as workmanship but is produced for retail. This was the first look.

Remy de la Mauviniere / AP/Remy de la Mauviniere / AP

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An upper hall of the Grand Palais in Paris was transformed into a dreamy banquet. Think traditional high tea with equal parts Bombay and Paris. Every single detail, from huge (the backdrop of aged, decorative arches) to tiny (gold foil dusted onto the fruit) is proof Chanel never goes halfway.

Benoit Tessier / Reuters/Benoit Tessier / Reuters

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This is the difference between costume and fashion. Lagerfeld streamlines a traditional tunic while adding a French touch of je ne sais quoi.

Remy de la Mauviniere / AP/Remy de la Mauviniere / AP

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Admire the dress if you wish but turn your attention to the table at right. Those are miniature rail tracks running along the edge and what you don’t see is the Lilliputian train – branded with the Chanel logo – that choo-choo’d around the never-ending centerpiece of fruit and flowers.

BENOIT TESSIER/Benoit Tessier / Reuters

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Something old, something new, something borrowed (nothing blue). Throughout the show, models were festooned with stunning tikka, or headpieces, reminiscent of Indian wedding jewellery.

Benoit Tessier / Reuters/Benoit Tessier / Reuters

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What would Coco think?

Benoit Tessier / Reuters/Benoit Tessier / Reuters

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There is something particularly decadent about this all ivory everything statement. Better still, the metal-embellished, fingerless gloves. Note the jacket tossed over the outfit. Such insouciant chic!

Remy de la Mauviniere / AP/Remy de la Mauviniere / AP

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Luxury is being able to combine faux dreadlock hair with an intricately beaded, appliquéd jacket.

Benoit Tessier / Reuters/Benoit Tessier / Reuters

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Here is British model Yasmin Le Bon who, let it be known, is 47 years old. Her coat alone screams old money-meets-new money. Meanwhile, her crimson tights seem destined for the one percent, legs edition.

Benoit Tessier / Reuters/Benoit Tessier / Reuters

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Lagerfeld didn’t leave out the men entirely. All of the looks featured wrapped headdresses that weren’t quite turbans but might just find a following among the unlikeliest types. Lil’ Wayne, perhaps? And doesn’t every man need a four-button white bouclé jacket?

Remy de la Mauviniere / AP/Remy de la Mauviniere / AP

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What would an homage to India be without a burst of colour. Used sparingly, bold red, hot pink and just a tad of teal kept the focus on materials and silhouette. These liquid metallic leggings appeared frequently under structured jackets and dresses.

Remy de la Mauviniere / AP/Remy de la Mauviniere / AP

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Karl Lagerfeld and supermodel thoroughbred Stella Tennant take a loop around the room, chatting sotto voce. He: I wonder if anyone actually ate the rosewater jelly cubes and aloo chat? She: Seriously, Karl? Fashion people don’t eat!

Benoit Tessier / Reuters/Benoit Tessier / Reuters

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