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Tia Elisabeth GlistaCourtesy Couturesque

Couturesque, a buzzy new online fashion source that covers everything from industry news and trend reports to interviews with international names, is helmed by a 17-year-old from Oakville, Ont. Danny Sinopoli spoke to Tia Elisabeth Glista, its teenaged editor-in-chief, about what it's like to run a (decidedly mature) publication 'by young fashion creatives for young fashion creatives' – and who to watch for next on the Canadian fashion scene

When you founded Couturesquemag.com in April 2014, what were you hoping to offer that other fashion publications didn't?

I strongly felt that fashion magazines were missing out on the growing demographic of bright, ambitious teenagers that I identified with – so many of the magazines for this age group are saturated with stories about celebrities, pieces that talk down to their readers and a distinct lack of awareness of the deep cultural and social issues that are associated with the fashion industry. I wanted to create a space for young people who are serious about this business and who want to have a legitimate impact on it.

What have been some of your editorial highlights so far?

In celebration of our one-year anniversary this spring, we interviewed a series of burgeoning talents in the fashion community – incredible people like [Canadian designer] Tanya Taylor. We also had our first major editorial shoot recently, which was a big accomplishment, and I got to direct and style it. It was so much fun being surrounded by like-minded young creatives working together to make this vision that I had come to life.

Couturesque's outlook is international, but you also cover the Canadian scene deeply. Who are some young Canadian fashion creatives we should be looking out for?

Last week, I had the chance to meet Sasha Xiao, whose Toronto-based e-boutique, Sashion, is focused on promoting Chinese craftsmanship and subverting the stigma surrounding garments that are made in China; she has an incredible vision and lots of creativity. Right now I'm working on a piece about Danielle Suzanne, a hypertalented young photographer who founded Zeum magazine [a biannual Canadian style journal] when she was at Ryerson; it now has subscribers globally and shows a lot of work from local creators. Canada also has some really interesting online influencers, such as Dani Roche and Bianca Venerayan from [Toronto collective] Kastor & Pollux, who are designers, bloggers, event coordinators, social-media mavens – you name it. I love how Canadians are doing their own thing and really standing out because of it.

This interview has been condensed and edited.