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Style Five style trends that should make their exit with 2017

STYLE

Fad to the bone

Five trends that should make their exit with 2017

Pompoms, not so wonderful

A wardrobe staple seen on the top of almost every Canadian's tuque, the pompom hopped its way through fashion and home decor this year, making appearances on everything from pillows and purses to sneakers and trivets. With its history as a juvenile accoutrement, the popularity of the pompom left design sophisticates crying twee. But even if plush popularity is waning, the perky aesthetic seems poised to live on. "I think they're so big because they are cute and accessible," says Vancouver-based stylist Leila Bani. She predicts the happy-go-lucky attitude will thrive in 2018 via a new-age obsession with colourful crystals.


Lost soles

The visual lovechild of normcore and athleisure, 2017's high-end sneakers reached brutalist heights and have been trolled not only for their extra aesthetic, but also insanely heavy price tags (a pair of bulky Giuseppa Zanottis will set you back around a grand). Ugly or not, Bani says they fit into a pair of trends – the loosening up of the fashion silhouette and a more androgynous approach in collections. "It makes sense, as people want to flex while still being comfortable," she explains, adding that what began in men's wear has trickled over into women's clothing. "I do see it continuing to become less gendered, as the world does."


Growing old

From the underground diner at the Beverly Hills Hotel to the floral-filled designs of London's House of Hackney, botanical wallpapers spread like weeds this year. "It was fresh, bold and added a touch of glamour people wanted to bring into their homes," explains interior designer Montana Labelle. But when coupled with dainty rose-gold furnishings, the ubiquitous look wilted fast. Next year, Labelle says interior design will shift to a more wabi-sabi style. "Think concrete, brick, Venetian plaster and handmade pottery with imperfections on display and raw, untreated wood finishes," she says.

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Brow-beaten

While the statement brow has been in for some time now, 2017 saw a supergroomed, superstark form take over. Taking this highly sculpted style – dubbed the "Instagram brow" – from social media to IRL has had a jarring effect on onlookers. "It photographs beautifully up close and complements all of the trending eye-makeup looks of the moment," explains Maddox Lu, national brow and trend artist at Benefit Cosmetics Canada, of its online appeal. Lu predicts 2018 will see the pendulum swing back to more wispy, feathery eyebrows. "Everything that is the anti-crisp, structured, perfectly styled eyebrow will become more prominent."


Black death

A macabre take on a sweet dish, black soft-serve ice cream caused a stir this year as the latest in a long line of desserts to solicit long queues. Unusual colouring, dubious health claims and clever flavour names (like the "Unicorn Tears" served at Little Damage in downtown L.A.) made it impossible for foodie influences to resist this photogenic if underwhelming dessert, and Toronto restaurateur Grant van Gameren doesn't think you should. "I say enjoy eating all the charcoal ice cream you want and don't let anyone tell you otherwise." Food for thought, and Instagram.

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