Skip to main content

For Andrew, having a job that he likes makes all the difference.

For employers in the service industry, finding motivated staff is a constant challenge. But the management team at the Wok Box in Surrey may have discovered a key to overcoming that challenge: by focusing on Andrew Csyani's contagious enthusiasm, admirable work ethic and great potential - rather than his developmental disability - they've found a committed, long-term employee.

For Andrew, having a job that he likes makes all the difference. On Thursdays and Fridays, he takes public transit to the popular restaurant on King George Highway where he started as a bus person. "My job was cleaning tables, sweeping floors and being polite to customers," he says. "I always say, 'Hi. How are you?'"

A recent graduate of the Douglas College Culinary Arts program, Food Handling Level 1, Andrew has now been promoted to cooking some of the Wok Box's famous stir-fries, something he says he enjoys very much.

Story continues below advertisement

While his enthusiasm and hard work have made him a valued employee at the Wok Box, he was initially connected with his employer through an employment service. Community Living BC (CLBC), a provincial crown agency, supports employment that help people with developmental disabilities make the most of their strengths and abilities. The employment service works with businesses to match the skills and interests of individuals who want to work with the staffing needs of their company.

The program, founded on the philosophy of inclusive employment, provides individuals with developmental disabilities the opportunity to work at jobs they enjoy, be paid real wages and feel valued as employees. For Andrew, having a job provides some financial independence, the self-esteem that comes from a job done well, and the opportunity to enjoy the company of people he wouldn't otherwise meet.

Andrew is very clear on what is required to be a good employee. "I need a good attitude, and to do my best. I stay focused, and don't get distracted," he says. "My boss says, 'You're a star - you work so hard.' That makes me feel proud."

Andrew is just one of thousands of people with developmental disabilities in British Columbia who have the ability and desire to work. Like most people, they view work as an important part of life - a portal to a sense of belonging, satisfaction and a way to be develop friendships and be social.

CLBC supports the concept of inclusive employment, which is founded on the idea that community workplaces should reflect the makeup of the people who live in the community. The agency is working to ensure that every person with a disability who wants employment has the opportunity to be employed.

For both employers and people with developmental disabilities, making that connection can be the beginning of a very rewarding relationship. Unlike many of his co-workers in Vancouver's service industry, for example, Andrew isn't dreaming of a breakthrough movie role. Though he's working hard to achieve future promotions at the Wok Box, when he's at work, he is exactly where he wants to be.

Asked about his goals for the future, he says: "I'd like to keep working here. I like the work. And the people are really nice."

Story continues below advertisement



Community Living Employment programs at a glance

People with disabilities represent an untapped resource of talent for employers. The job performance of persons with disabilities has proven to meet or exceed that of employees without disabilities and co-workers often report a more positive workplace when a person with a disability is part of the workforce.

There is a network of agencies and service providers available to help businesses hire people with disabilities.

  • Community Living BC is committed to ensuring services are available to assist adults with a developmental disability to find and keep employment that is uniquely tailored to their individual needs.
  • CLBC and service providers connects individuals with development disabilities to individuals who help them find out what kind of work they can and want to do, teach them skills and help them look for a job or with self-employment.
  • CLBC and community employment agencies are committed to working with the business sector to foster and promote inclusive employment, through such initiatives as the Customized Employment Demonstration Project and supported training for employment specialists who provide employment services.

To learn more about how you can maximize their abilities in your organization visit CLBC's thorough Employment Initiative resources.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies