Skip to main content
Canada’s most-awarded newsroom for a reason
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
Canada’s most-awarded newsroom for a reason
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
// //

Champagne houses and sparkling wine producers originally embraced tall flutes because they emphasize the bubbles in the wine.

Olga Kochina/iStockPhoto / Getty Images

For more wine advice and reviews, recipes, restaurant news and more, sign up to receive our Good Taste newsletter in your inbox every Wednesday.

It’s a common question: Are delicate, stretched and slender Champagne flutes better than the shallow and squat coupe glasses that were fashionable during the Roaring Twenties? Other wine lovers wonder if there’s a need for a specific glass for sparkling wine.

Like most elements of wine appreciation, it comes down to a matter of preference. The serving temperature and glass you use will affect the taste and enjoyment of whichever wine or sparkling wine you are serving. Pour the same wine into different glasses and you’ll see differences in intensity of aroma, range of flavours and possibly even texture (how the wine feels in your mouth).

Story continues below advertisement

Champagne houses and sparkling wine producers originally embraced tall flutes because they emphasize the bubbles in the wine. It also put an air of sophistication on the product.

Having a different glass to serve a sparkling wine put it in a different realm than conventional wine.

But as consumption of still wine increased in the 1980s, 1990s and beyond, sparkling and Champagne sales didn’t keep pace. It was typecast as a wine for special occasions. Some consumers may not consider it as a wine option.

More recently, Champagne houses started to show their bubbly in white wine glasses to reveal more of their aroma and flavour compared to a flute glass’s narrow shape. Most top producers, including well-known houses such as Krug, Perrier-Jouët and Veuve Clicquot, have made custom glasses to showcase the best attributes of their individual cuvées. Houses such as Veuve Clicquot, which use more pinot noir in the blend of their base wines, tend to have more balloon shaped glasses.

During a virtual tasting last month, Veuve Clicquot chef de cave Didier Mariotti told me it’s rare to see flutes used these days. “I see more and more people drinking Champagne in a white wine glass more than a flute here in France.”

In the coming weeks and months, as restaurants reopen and guests gather around tables in greater numbers, it will be interesting to see what sommeliers and waiters will use for sparkling wine and Champagne.

When it comes to serving and enjoying bubbly at home, there have always been elements to consider. Which types of glasses are available? If you have flutes or coupes, are there enough for everyone?

Story continues below advertisement

My choice is to use conventional white wine glasses. Getting rid of my flutes has created much needed space in my cupboard and I enjoy the character of the sparkling wine more while still having the opportunity to watch the bubbles dance in the glass.

E-mail your wine and spirits questions to The Globe. Look for answers to select questions to appear in the Good Taste newsletter and on The Globe and Mail website.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow the author of this article:

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies