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Eleven year-old Kerimal Suriel receives an H1N1 swine flu vaccine at the Children's Hospital Boston primary care clinic in Boston, Massachusetts October 7, 2009.

BRIAN SNYDER/REUTERS/BRIAN SNYDER/REUTERS



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GETTING THE POINT

While some Canadians who went to the first swine flu vaccination clinics faced long line-ups, public health officials say there is enough supply for everyone who wants to get immunized.

Each province and region is setting its own dates for rolling out H1N1 vaccinations. Most are already giving shots to health-care workers and those most likely to develop complications, including pregnant women, young children and those with chronic health conditions.

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SYMPTOMS

The main symptom of the H1N1 influenza virus is a sudden onset of cough and fever. Common symptoms are fatigue, muscle aches, sore throat, headache, decreased appetite and a runny nose. In addition, symptoms sometimes include nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO IF YOU FEEL SICK?

Public health officials say that generally healthy people who develop these symptoms should stay at home to avoid infecting others. However, pregnant women, young children and those with pre-existing health problems should contact their doctors as soon as possible because they may need antiviral medications, such as Tamiflu.

HOW IT SPREADS

The H1N1 virus spreads through tiny droplets that can travel up to two metres when someone coughs or sneezes. If these droplets land in your eyes, nose or mouth, you may become infected with the virus.

In addition to getting vaccinated, public health officials advise washing your hands frequently and keeping your hands away from your eyes, nose and mouth. Cough or sneeze into a tissue or your elbow.

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WHERE CAN YOU GET VACCINATED

The following links provide detailed locations and times for clinics all across the country

British Columbia

Alberta

Saskatchewan

Manitoba

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Ontario

Quebec

New Brunskwick

Nova Scotia

Prince Edwards Island

Newfoundland and Labrador

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