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Cyclists who die of head injury less likely to have worn helmet: study

A study has found that cyclists who die of a head injury are much less likely to be wearing a helmet than those who die of other injuries.

Researchers looked at 129 accidental cycling deaths in Ontario between 2006 and 2010, using data from the Office of the Chief Coroner.

They found cyclists who didn't wear a helmet were three times more likely to die of a fatal head injury than those who wore head protection while riding.

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Lead author Dr. Nav Persaud says more than three-quarters of the deaths involved a collision with a motor vehicle, and most of those who died were age 18 or older.

The family physician at Toronto's St. Michael's Hospital says the study shows helmets save lives and their use should be mandatory for all ages across the country.

Legislation requiring helmet use for children and adult cyclists varies across the country.

The study is published in Monday's issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

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