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A frame grab of Fox News coverage of the Ebola story on Wednesday, Oct 15, 2014.

Fox

Thomas Eric Duncan, 42, had a high fever and his temperature was 103 degrees during his four-hour visit to the emergency room of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital on Sept. 25, according to 1,400 pages of medical records that Duncan's family provided to The Associated Press.

Here is a timeline of the events:

Sept. 19: Thomas Eric Duncan, 42, departs from Liberia on Brussels Airlines flight to Belgium.

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Sept. 20: Mr. Duncan flies to Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, connecting through the Dulles airport near Washington, to reunite with his fiancée and their college-age son in Dallas.

Sept. 24: He begins having symptoms.

Sept. 25: He seeks medical care at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital's emergency room for fever and abdominal pain. He tells a nurse he had travelled from Africa, but is sent home.

Sept. 28: He returns to hospital by ambulance and is placed in isolation because doctors suspect Ebola.

Sept. 30: He tests positive for Ebola.

Oct. 2: Members of the family with whom Mr. Duncan was staying are confined to their home under armed guard.

Oct. 3: Health officials say they are monitoring the health of nearly 50 people who had varying degrees of contact with Mr. Duncan, including 10 considered at higher risk.

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Oct. 8: Mr. Duncan dies at the hospital.

Oct. 10: Nina Pham, 26, a nurse who provided care for Mr. Duncan, goes to hospital with a fever. She tests positive for Ebola and is put into isolation at Texas Health Presbyterian.

Oct. 13: Amber Vinson, 29, another nurse who helped care for Mr. Duncan, flies from Cleveland to Dallas/Fort Worth on Frontier Airlines Flight 1143. She had arrived in Cleveland on Oct. 8 to visit her mother in a preparation for a wedding.

Oct. 14: Ms. Vinson reports Ebola symptoms and is put into isolation at Texas Health Presbyterian.

Oct. 15: Ms. Vinson is transferred by air to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, one of four U.S. hospitals with specialized isolation units to treat Ebola patients. Meanwhile, Ms. Pham is reported to be in "improved condition," according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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