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A study found nearly 5,000 tricycle-related injuries a year are treated in hospitals.

NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images

The numbers

More than 9,000 tricycle-related injuries were treated in U.S. emergency rooms in 2012 and 2013, or nearly 5,000 each year, according to the study by researchers at Medical College of Georgia and Emory University. Scant previous research on the topic prompted the study, which involved an analysis of data in a national injury surveillance system. The system collects information on emergency room visits for non-fatal injuries linked with consumer products. It is run by the federal Consumer Product Safety Commission.

The injuries

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Two-year-olds were most frequently injured, and injuries were slightly more common in little boys. Skin gashes were the most common injury and heads were most commonly injured. Less than 3 per cent of the children had to be hospitalized, but those youngsters had serious injuries including limb amputations, fractures and internal organ damage.

The study was published Monday in the journal Pediatrics.

The safety commission receives occasional reports of tricycle-linked deaths, including nine from 2010 through last year. Most were drownings, after tricycles tumbled into pools. Other causes: fatal head injuries after falls, or being struck by a car.

The advice

The American Academy of Pediatrics says most children don't have the balance or co-ordination to ride a tricycle until around the age of 3.

Tricycles that are low to the ground, with big wheels, are safest, and helmets should be worn, the academy says. Proper supervision is advised, including keeping little cyclists away from pools and streets.

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