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Take a tour of Rush guitarist Alex Lifeson’s country home

This well-designed country home set amid forest provides refuge and a degree of simplicity for Rush's Alex Lifeson and his family

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Charlene Zivojinovich sits in the living room of her and Alex Lifeson's country home, designed by architect Dimitri Papatheodorou.

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The kitchen provides a jolt of colour with cabinet doors lacquered in lipstick red.

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The flight of stairs leading to the upper levels of the home.

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A rug made of ties in one of the guest rooms. There are five bedrooms that can accommodate adult kids, two grandsons and the occasional guest.

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The wine cellar.

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One of the bathrooms.

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The living room accommodates large gatherings and provides views of the gardens and forest. A two-sided fireplace stands between the living room and dining room.

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The house uses geothermal energy in the ground for heating and cooling, supplemented by propane and electricity.

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Charlene Zivojinovich and Dimitri Papatheodorou stand in the living room of Ms. Zivojinovich and Alex Lifeson’s country home.

Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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The staircase of glass, wood and metal sits on the east-west axis of the home.

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The home’s position on a ridge offers vistas of nearby farms from the second-floor master suite and family bedrooms.

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Sandstone and ipe surround the swimming pool, which is set on a terrace overlooking the forest.

photos by Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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The house sits on a natural belvedere, set back from the road and surrounded by pine trees.

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On the second floor, a master suite provides privacy in a far corner of the house. There, Mr. Lifeson can retreat to his office and find quiet time away from guests and kids.

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A smaller family room sits next to the kitchen and inevitably becomes the place where the kids hang out.

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