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The Globe and Mail

5 pieces of futuristic decor that should be in your home right now

Home-decor designers are among those leading the way in the creative revolution that is 3-D printing

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Shade shifter: The dynamic shade of the Bloom Table Lamp, designed by Patrick Jouin for .MGX by Materialise, features an intricate system of 3-D-printed petals and hinges. When the cover is open, the light floods out. When it’s closed, the light is dimmed to a gentle glow. €2,000 ($2,705). Through mgxbymaterialise.com.

Thomas Duval/Thomas Duval

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Rocking out: Dirk Vander Kooij’s Flow Open rocker – made by a 3-D-printing robot from the recycled innards of refrigerators – is proportioned to work equally well as a dining, office or lounge chair. The subtly ribbed seat comes in myriad colours including red, green, grey and gradient (shown here). €760 ($1,025). Through dirkvanderkooij.nl.

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Beautiful decay: Eragatory’s Floralia vase is reminiscent of a pretty, old-fashioned pitcher. At least, one that’s survived the post-zombie apocalypse. The contrast between the classic base and the pink, mottled top looks like something that could only previously have been achieved using Photoshop. $99. Through shapeways.com/shops/eragatory.

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Not so tough: Toronto-based Hot Pop Factory 3-D-prints jewellery with an architectural edge (possibly because its young founders, Bi-Ying Miao and Matt Compeau, both studied architecture at the University of Waterloo). The Platonix bracelet looks sharp but is actually made of giving nylon. $74. Through hotpopfactory.com.

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Coral white: With his gorgeous white vase, German designer Wieland Schmidt marries futuristic tech with a sensual organic form. The piece was produced from a sophisticated polymer mesh that, up close, could be from The Matrix but, as a whole, is easily mistaken for a chunk of coral from the Great Barrier Reef. €800.($1,080). Through shapeandform.de.

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Making mistakes: Belgian-based studio Unfold created its Stratigraphic cups and pitcher to see if they could replicate the perfectly imperfect quality of hand-made pottery. Depending on the type of porcelain used and the kind of printer, the ceramics each have their own idiosyncrasies, variations and flaws. Through unfold.be.

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