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Decades of dining on minimalist dishes is giving way to ceramics with peculiar shapes and naive textures. Anya Georgijevic profiles the potters bringing handwork back to the métier. Photos by Stacey Brandford. Styling by Jason MacIsaac

Ceramics, at their core, are a uniquely human form. They're something we hold in our hands, created for us by someone else's hands. Ever since humans discovered what happens when clay meets fire, ceramics have been part of our daily lives, for both their functional and decorative values. But when the industrial revolution introduced mass-production through slip casting, the role of the artisan potter – and the more personal relationship to the craft of creating ceramics – began to fade away.

The last two decades of the 20th century churned out affordable modern dishware that spoke to the streamlined, minimalist aesthetic of the era. At the same time, the burden of practicality had been lifted and ceramicists were suddenly free to create work that is desired rather than needed. Now, with the resurgence of an appreciation for handcrafted objects, young ceramicists whose output no longer has to compete with the perfection of machine-made goods are discovering the value of their unique thumbprint.

HANG IT ALL While most ceramicists focus on tabletop pieces, Michelle Quan’s garden bells elevate the handmade look to new heights. Clockwise from top left: Michelle Quan bells, $210 to $480 (U.S.) through www.mquan.com. Aureola tea set (includes pot, strainer and two cups) by Luca Nichetto, $540 at Mjolk (www.mjolk.ca). Small teacup, stylist’s own. Japanese Maple bonsai in Nick Lenz pot, courtesy of the Bonsai Society at Royal Botanical Gardens (www.bonsairbg.com). Historic pottery from the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City, stylist’s own. Helen Levi pot, $175 at Likely General (www.likelygeneral.tumblr.com).

HANG IT ALL While most ceramicists focus on tabletop pieces, Michelle Quan’s garden bells elevate the handmade look to new heights. Clockwise from top left: Michelle Quan bells, $210 to $480 (U.S.) through www.mquan.com. Aureola tea set (includes pot, strainer and two cups) by Luca Nichetto, $540 at Mjolk (www.mjolk.ca). Small teacup, stylist’s own. Japanese Maple bonsai in Nick Lenz pot, courtesy of the Bonsai Society at Royal Botanical Gardens (www.bonsairbg.com). Historic pottery from the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City, stylist’s own. Helen Levi pot, $175 at Likely General (www.likelygeneral.tumblr.com).

Stacey Brandford

"I think when you're making things on a wheel, it should look like it. I'm not trying to make something that's so perfect," says Brooklyn-based potter Clair Catillaz, who works under the moniker Clam Lab. She creates stoneware with minimalist restraint, but without the tedious symmetry of a mass-produced product. For the self-taught potter who studied public policy and urban studies in university, maintaining evidence of the maker's hand is of utmost importance, identifying the product as one-of-a-kind.

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Her sculptural shapes reference the Mediterranean bronze age, a period that introduced the potter's wheel to the craft. Catillaz uses a combination of wheel throwing and hand coiling (a process where lengths of clay are built up to create a three dimensional shape) to form her stoic jugs. Her intricate glazing process results in an array of textures from milky smooth to naively crusty. "I'm trying to be honest in the way I'm actually making things," she says. While Clam Lab sounds like a multi-member studio, it is, in fact, a one-woman operation. When Catillaz set up her business, little did she know that her work would soon be in high demand through independent decor shops.

When an international retailer approached her with a collaboration offer, Catillaz turned it down. "I don't really think that customer is looking for something special, usually," she says. "Or maybe that's not a right way of putting it. I'm trying to go in a more high-end direction than that. And, for example, if I were to make a more consumer-based line, it would have to be a serious departure from the work I'm doing now." Catillaz doesn't feel the kind of pressure to grow her business in a way that might threaten her sense of creative integrity. "That's not really what motivates me at all. I like making one-of-a-kind special things."

STILL LIFE STATEMENT Artist Julie Moon’s work ranges from ornamental sculptures to functional pieces such as vases and footstools. From left: Julie Moon ombre floral bouquet, $4,200 through www.juliemoon.com. Shino Takeda, sky, $70 (U.S.), rabbit $200 (U.S.) and garden $100 (U.S.)planters through www.shinotakeda.com. Julie Moon Scallop vase, $250, and Dazzle stool, $1,100.

STILL LIFE STATEMENT Artist Julie Moon’s work ranges from ornamental sculptures to functional pieces such as vases and footstools. From left: Julie Moon ombre floral bouquet, $4,200 through www.juliemoon.com. Shino Takeda, sky, $70 (U.S.), rabbit $200 (U.S.) and garden $100 (U.S.) planters through www.shinotakeda.com. Julie Moon Scallop vase, $250, and Dazzle stool, $1,100.

Stacey Brandford

Shino Takeda works with a similar ethos. "Most of my works are very personal: my history, my experience," says the New Yorker. Having grown up immersed in the ceramics community of Kyushu, a Japanese island regarded for its intricate porcelain, she recognized the important role tableware plays in food culture. But it wasn't until she turned 20 and relocated to the Big Apple that she began experimenting with clay herself. After enrolling in a pottery class in 2010, Takeda fell in love with the craft and joined a studio as a hobby. Soon after, she bid farewell to a career in dance and embraced her new calling full time.

Takeda's work is meant for daily use. Much of her inspiration comes from cooking and she enjoys seeing how the plating of different foods transforms her designs. "I want people to use and feel them. I want people to enjoy decorating them with food," she says. "But when they are not using them, I want to make sure that my work is interesting enough to be decorative." Takeda's earthy stoneware has an undeniably handmade quality, with its uneven shapes and expressionist glaze inspired by her adopted hometown. She sees beauty in New York's imperfections. "I want every piece to have its own personality. I'm hoping the strange shape will make people want to hold it in their hands." The so-called imperfections are an aesthetic choice, a response to ubiquitous mass-produced pottery. "A lot of people around me want to have less, but something original. And [they] also want to know where they are coming from, and the story behind it."

BLUE MOOD Shades from azure to cobalt achieve new depth when rendered in matte glazes. Top row from left: Large blue pottery, stylist’s own. Tom Luciano Zeus candlestick, $450 (U.S.) through www. timeandmaterialsantiques.com. Maggie Boyd hanging planter, $55 through www.maggieboydceramics.com. Victoria Morris vases, $350 (U.S.) each through www.victoriamorrispottery.com. Bottom row, from left: Raw ivory stoneware, $60 each at Dynasty (www.dynastytoronto.com). Pottery bowl, stylist’s own. Michelle Quan Moon Phase planter, $380 (U.S.)through www.mquan.com.

BLUE MOOD Shades from azure to cobalt achieve new depth when rendered in matte glazes. Top row from left: Large blue pottery, stylist’s own. Tom Luciano Zeus candlestick, $450 (U.S.) through www.timeandmaterialsantiques.com. Maggie Boyd hanging planter, $55 through www.maggieboydceramics.com. Victoria Morris vases, $350 (U.S.) each through www.victoriamorrispottery.com. Bottom row, from left: Raw ivory stoneware, $60 each at Dynasty (www.dynastytoronto.com). Pottery bowl, stylist’s own. Michelle Quan Moon Phase planter, $380 (U.S.)through www.mquan.com.

Stacey Brandford

On the decorative side of the pottery spectrum, Toronto-based Julie Moon creates jaw-dropping earthenware sculptures. While studying fibre arts at the Ontario College of Art and Design, the artist discovered that changing mediums would liberate her from the two-dimensional nature of textiles. "I can build unique forms; I can still play with decoration," says Moon, who received her Master's of Fine Arts at the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University.

Moon's botanical still-lifes are coil-built; she doesn't work on a potter's wheel. "Once I build the form, it's like an armature. Then I can start attaching petals or flowers," she says. Her floral vases often combine contrasting styles. Sometimes the vessel takes inspiration from the abstraction of Mexican fabrics, while the floral arrangement on top looks like a hyper-realist dream. "For a while, I was looking at Matisse a lot," she says. "When I started the still-life series, I was just trying to recreate some of the things I've seen in his paintings. He's always referencing fashion and plants and carpets – I almost feel like they were fashion editorials."

Moon's work can primarily be found in craft galleries, although she has explored working with retailers like Anthropologie on smaller decorative objects such as tiles. "It's hard to make money from ceramics," says Moon, who also runs a ceramic jewellery shop on Etsy.

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SHELFIEWORTHY Collected in a cabinet, small pieces stand out with their varying textures, colours and sheens. Top row, from left: Maggie Boyd vase, $40 through www.maggieboydceramics.com. ClamLab, pitcher, $350 (U.S.) through www.clamlab.com. Small red vintage vase, vintage Seacrest earthenware vase, Kat and Roger tumbler, small blue pot, all stylist’s own. Middle row, from left: ClamLab blue vase, $240. Handmade flower plates by Masanobu Ando, $95 each at Mjolk (www.mjolk.ca). Pottery mezcal cup and dish, stylist’s own. Maggie Boyd large vase, $90, portrait of the artist as a clay cup, $40, medium bud vase $40. Bottom row, from left: Cactus in vintage green pot, vintage wooden frog, stylist’s own. Homebody Ceramics cup, $40 and bowl, $40 through www.homebodyceramics.ca. Small vessel, stylist’s own. Cody Hoyt objet, $450 through www.codyhoyt.tumblr.com. Vintage earthenware bowl, stylist’s own. ClamLab bowl, $60 (U.S.), and pitcher, $150 (U.S.) through www.clamlab.com.

SHELFIEWORTHY Collected in a cabinet, small pieces stand out with their varying textures, colours and sheens. Top row, from left: Maggie Boyd vase, $40 through www.maggieboydceramics.com. ClamLab, pitcher, $350 (U.S.) through www.clamlab.com. Small red vintage vase, vintage Seacrest earthenware vase, Kat and Roger tumbler, small blue pot, all stylist’s own. Middle row, from left: ClamLab blue vase, $240. Handmade flower plates by Masanobu Ando, $95 each at Mjolk (www.mjolk.ca). Pottery mezcal cup and dish, stylist’s own. Maggie Boyd large vase, $90, portrait of the artist as a clay cup, $40, medium bud vase $40. Bottom row, from left: Cactus in vintage green pot, vintage wooden frog, stylist’s own. Homebody Ceramics cup, $40 and bowl, $40 through www.homebodyceramics.ca. Small vessel, stylist’s own. Cody Hoyt objet, $450 through www.codyhoyt.tumblr.com. Vintage earthenware bowl, stylist’s own. ClamLab bowl, $60 (U.S.), and pitcher, $150 (U.S.) through www.clamlab.com.

Stacey Brandford

The artist recently began producing small furniture pieces like stools and side tables glazed with bold colours and patterns. A revived interest in one-of-a-kind ceramics is on her side. "I think it's a reaction against digital stuff or mass-produced stuff," she says, dissecting the trend. "If you have a bit of the hand showing, there is humanity in that."

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