Skip to main content

How do you get a home chef's motor running? You design a kitchen sporting the hi-tech lines and luxury of a legendary sports car.

At this weekend's Fall Home Show in Toronto, designer Mike Ford of the firm Dolce Mano has taken everyone's dream automobile - the Aston Martin - and turned it into a modern, ultra chic kitchen.

"I wanted to capture the feeling and quality of a luxury automobile in a kitchen," the designer explains. "Through materials, colour and style, I think that we were able to capture the sleek and timeless appeal" of a car that none other than James Bond drives.

Story continues below advertisement

Featuring a leather-upholstered island, vertical lift-up cabinets and turbo-drive drawers (they basically open and close for you), the kitchen is geared to appeal to a largely untapped market: male foodies.

"The kitchen is the focal point of the home for many families and, since men are increasingly managing this hub, it is only natural that the design of the kitchen reflects this," John Fazari, vice-president of Dolce Mano, says.

But this kitchen isn't just for the boys. According to Fazari, "women are loving the motorized cabinetry and we've already had dozens of requests for the leather finish."

With a price tag of about $60,000, the kitchen, which takes about eight to 10 weeks to deliver, is less pricey than its namesake car. And like the auto, it's available in a range of finishes.

Gentlemen, start your ovens?

Dolce Mano's kitchen will be on display at the Fall Home Show ( ) in Toronto through tomorrow. For more information, visit .

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter