Skip to main content

Playing nice with your child’s teacher

Wency Leung talks to parents and educators for their tips on how to negotiate, communicate and solve conflicts with the other adult helping to rear your child.

Read the full story


istockphoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto

What to do if your child is being bullied at school

Schoolyard bullies don’t pick on just anyone. Like wolves culling caribou, they single out the wounded, the stragglers, the loners who stray from the herd. The best way to fight back, according to new research, is to make sure that tormenting your kid is not worth the bully’s while. Adriana Barton speaks to three specialists on how to inoculate your child against bullying.

Story continues below advertisement

Read the full story


Beat the back-to-school blues with these fun and educational excursions

These enriching Canadian travel experiences, from excursions around sprawling French fortifications in Nova Scotia to a fossil safari in Alberta, will pique your child’s interest in learning.

Read the full story


The stress-free lunch box

Scrambling for lunch ideas? Emma Waverman offers her essential pantry list and last-minute tips, with a little help from Leslie Beck.

Read the full story


KatarzynaBialasiewicz/istockphoto.com

As students head to school, here are some tips on what to eat – and avoid – to minimize stress

After a stress-free summer, heading back to the classroom – or the office – can create feelings of anxiety in many of us. And your diet may be partly to blame, writes Leslie Beck. While diet won’t cure anxiety, eating a steady fare of nutritious and well-balanced meals and snacks may help improve your mood. Use this guide on what to eat – and what to avoid – to help lessen anxiety.

Read the full story

Story continues below advertisement


HANDOUT

The best backpacks, for back-to-school and beyond

Regardless of your age, the freedom that comes with a fuss-free carryall is truly potent. Perhaps that’s why you’ve been seeing them crop up on runways so frequently of late.

Read the full story


It takes only one good teacher to change a student’s life

Gillian Best writes about her experiences growing up as a smart aleck who hated school. When one teacher saw something promising in her, Best describes how it completely changed the trajectory of her life – for the better.

Read the full story


Back-to-school time offers young people a chance to grow as human beings

One of the great successes of the Canadian school system is building a sense of social responsibility and connection with youth, writes Rick Hansen. By creating opportunities for students to be formally educated and mentored within the school curriculum, through extracurricular leadership activities and in collaboration with external organizations, students are given the tools to serve their community, locally, nationally and globally.

Read the full story

Story continues below advertisement


© Hedrich Blessing Photographers.

How the evolution of playgrounds has eroded children’s freedom

That city kids need a place for healthy outdoor play is sacrosanct. But as design critic Alexandra Lange explores in her new book, The Design of Childhood, the playground has taken on many guises in the past century, not all of them in the best interest of youngsters. Adults, it seems, sometimes get in the way.

Read the full story


iStockphoto/iStockphoto

As grandkids head back to school, we can all learn a thing or two

Sandra Martin writes about watching her grandkids head off for their first day of school and how the experience reawakened her own need for a jolt of resilience.

Read the full story


A grandparent’s back-to-school blues

With his granddaughter about to start junior kindergarten, Steve Watson wonders why is it such a struggle to let go?

Read the full story


Kevin Van Paassen/The Globe and Mail

The pitfalls and perks of having your parent as your teacher

In many smaller communities in Canada, there is often no escaping it: The only English teacher might be your mom, or that mandatory phys-ed class might be taught by your dad. Zosia Bielski spoke with children of parent-teachers across Canada about the highs and the lows of this unconventional educational arrangement.

Read the full story


From the funny to the infuriating, teachers’ tales of seizing students’ stuff

From a high-school teacher in Brantford, Ont., confiscating a baby squirrel from a student, to an elementary school teacher in Calgary whose keys mysteriously went missing at the end of the day, stories of the pranks children get up to.

Read the full story

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.