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In this Monday, July 16, 2012 photo, Barbie products are displayed at a local toy store in Hialeah, Fla.

Alan Diaz/AP

Barbie has had more than 150 careers in her lifetime, so you know her résumé is off the charts. Now, the world's most famous doll has entered the modern age with a LinkedIn page. And yes, those résumé woes are top of mind.

"While a one-page resume is best, I can't seem to get mine under twenty. It's just that when anything is possible, a girl is tempted to try everything she can," it says on the page.

Last year alone, Barbara "Barbie" Millicent Roberts (that's her full name, in case you didn't know) was a space explorer, sweets chef, magician, baby doctor and dolphin trainer. The year before that, she was a presidential candidate, fashion designer, zoo doctor, paleontologist and arctic rescuer.

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She's come along way from her first job: teenage fashion model.

In her latest incarnation, "entrepreneur" Barbie is out to "inspire girls to dream big." As the page says, "My new business is 'Dream Incubator' where I act as a consultant, helping girls around the world play out their imagination, try on different careers, and explore the world around them. Our company tagline is 'If you Can Dream It, You Can Be it!'"

The LinkedIn page, which currently has more than 1,600 followers, can be viewed as "a way for Mattel to modernize Barbie for the lean-in era," according to the website Digiday.com.

It's also great marketing for the new doll, who comes carrying a purse, tablet and smartphone.

To add a bit of heft to that marketing, Mattel has partnered with eight real-world female entrepreneurs who will offer career tips and advice. The list includes the founders of Sugarfina, Rent the Runway, Girls Who Code and One Kings Lane.

They may all be trying to inspire young girls to pursue their dreams, but the doll itself isn't winning everyone over.

"Entrepreneur Barbie reminds us that – like every other ostensibly inspiring incarnation of the doll – her main role is to look pretty and wear lots of pink," Clare O'Connor writes in Forbes.

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