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One American university has decided that books weren't enough to help students pass their exams. So administrators at the University of New Hampshire brought dogs into the library for a little stress-relieving pet therapy. Among the canine therapists is a nine-year-old golden retriever named Mia.

The idea is called "frenzy-free finals" and is sponsored by a number of groups at the university. As the dean for library administration, Tracey Lauder, explained to CNN, dogs offer the students a study break. "

The library strives to provide the resources students need for success – whether it be a book, video camera, digitized media or a gluten-free cookie and cuddle with a dog."

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That's right, the library also offers student home-made cookies to keep their sugar up and massage chairs when they need a back rub. And once in a while, there's a group "primal scream" in which students go out to the grand foyer and yell. This one was followed by an ice-cream social. "It's a nice little bonding moment," one student said.

Now, before comments about coddled university students begin, let's think about it: In their most stressful moments, who wouldn't want to sit back in a massage chair with a quiet dog at their side and enjoy an ice cream sundae?

Silly distraction or smart de-stresser? What stress relievers would you like to see in your workplace?

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