Skip to main content

Beautiful young woman using aloe vera at home, closeup

serezniy/iStockPhoto / Getty Images

During my childhood summers spent at my grandparents’ farmhouse in Quebec, my grandmother would regularly anoint my cousins and me with aloe from the plant in her living room to soothe any manner of skin troubles, from blisters and sunburns to bug bites. Aloe’s healing abilities are a result of the polysaccharides in its gel that impart protective effects on skin, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. With the increasing interest in botanical-based skin care, the household succulent is enjoying a starring role in many beauty products.

In skin care, aloe extract is used to calm a stressed-out visage. It’s featured in Garnier’s new-to-Canada Bio range, a collection that’s certified organic by Ecocert Greenlife, as part of its Rich Argan Nourishing Moisturizer. It’s also included in the new Sensitive Skin Care Line from Canadian men’s brand CW Beggs and Sons to treat skin irritated by shaving. Its hydrating properties are also being used in hair care by Herbal Essences, which launches a new aloe-focused collection this month. It’s part of the brand’s ongoing partnership with Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, a leading global researcher in plants, that endorses the efficacy of Herbal’s specific botanicals.

Herbal Essences Bio: Renew Potent Aloe & Hemp Shampoo and Conditioner, $7.99 each at drugstores and mass retailers (herbalessences.ca).

Story continues below advertisement

Visit tgam.ca/newsletters to sign up for the weekly Style newsletter, your guide to fashion, design, entertaining, shopping and living well. And follow us on Instagram @globestyle.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter
To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies