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Style Canada’s Mejuri is shaking up the jewellery business with its approach to bauble-buying

The Mejuri showroom at 43 Spring St. in New York.

Tyler Hayward/Mejuri

Brands chasing that finicky millennial client would be wise to take a page from Mejuri’s playbook. Founded in 2015, the Toronto-based fine jewellery company takes a radical approach to the culture of bauble buying, shifting it from the once-or-twice-a-year gift received to something young women purchase for themselves (around 80 per cent of Mejuri shoppers buy for themselves or their friends). “We are part of the target market, so we design thinking of ourselves, our friends,” creative director Justine Lançon says.

Similar to highly covetable streetwear brands such as Supreme, Mejuri follows a drop model, where a handful of new pieces are introduced each Monday instead of the traditional seasonal offerings. “Going direct to consumer, we didn’t want to change the way that jewellery is made. We understand the traditions and techniques, and that the top manufacturers are there for a reason,” chief executive Noura Sakkijha says. “Selling directly to the consumer with non-traditional marketing, we cut down on a lot of inefficiencies and cost and pass the savings on to customers without compromising the quality of the product.”

Earlier this month, Mejuri expanded south of the border, with its first U.S. showroom joining the first Canadian location in Toronto. In New York’s bustling Nolita neighbourhood, the bright boutique is meant to be a gathering place where Mejuri’s clients can experience the ethically sourced gems in person and attend special events such as piercing parties and panel discussions on self-care. “We think of ourselves as elevated, but casual,” Lançon says. “When you enter the store, it’s very refined, but it’s also very welcoming.”

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Mejuri Showroom, 43 Spring St., New York, mejuri.com.

Mejuri mini hoop earring, $37.

Mejuri

Mejuri spiral earrings, $159.

Mejuri

Mejuri Diamonds Team ring, $513.

Mejuri

Style news

Hugo Boss and Porsche have announced an upcoming partnership centred on Formula E racing, an electric racing series that first launched in 2014 as a means of demonstrating the potential of electric mobility. Beginning next December, Porsche will launch its own electric-powered racing team to be outfitted by Hugo Boss, which will also be the official apparel brand for Porsche’s global motorsports teams. To celebrate, in March, the brands will be launching the Porsche x Boss capsule collection of men’s wear featuring leather and wool pieces in silver, black and red. For more information, visit hugoboss.com.

American fashion house Michael Kors recently unveiled a new flagship store at Toronto’s Yorkdale Shopping Centre. Sitting at nearly 6,000 square feet, the store marks the first time that the Michael Kors Collection ready-to-wear label and an assortment of the Michael Kors men’s label will be available at a Canadian Michael Kors boutique. The store also carries the Michael Michael Kors line/correct/, including its ready-to-wear, footwear and accessories, in addition to watches, eyewear and a selection of fragrances. Its new design mirrors the brand’s London flagship store in a palette of soft browns and grays.

Just in time for a holiday food-coma-induced Netflix binge is the new docuseries 7 Days Out. Premiering on Dec. 21, each episode chronicles a week in the life of a different visionary in the fields of fashion, food, aerospace, sports and entertainment leading up to a major event. The debut episode follows fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld as he prepares for the spring 2018 haute couture show by Chanel, the French fashion house of which he has been at the helm since 1983, and gives a behind-the-scenes look as the Chanel team transforms Paris’s Grand Palais for the garden-themed presentation.

Two pop-up shops are catering to last-minute shoppers in Toronto. Montreal-based Kombi Sports, a winter-accessories brand, has its first Toronto pop-up in Union Station. Stocked with everything you need to stay warm over the holidays and beyond, it will be open until the end of December. Meanwhile in Leslieville, Sapling Child, a producer of 100-per-cent organic baby clothes, is popping up until Feb. 7 at 1093 Queen St. E. Find pieces from its recent collaboration with television personality Kristin Cavallari as well as its signature adorable heart pants for babies.


Visit tgam.ca/newsletters to sign up for the weekly Style newsletter, your guide to fashion, design, entertaining, shopping and living well. And follow us on Instagram @globestyle.

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