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Style Canadian Squish Candies makes its London debut at Harrods

For Squish Candies president and founder Sarah Segal, gummy bears are more than just at the centre of her profession – they’re a lifelong obsession. “Actually, my love of gummies started in England,” she says. “I used to go there in the summer and, when I was about 11, I filled my suitcase with Haribo.” This fall, the story of Segal’s British-born sweet tooth went full circle when Harrods came calling. The historic London shopping destination approached the Montrealer about adding Squish Candies to its luxury confectionery selection after discovering the brand on Instagram.

When it launched in 2014, Squish made waves as one of the first specialty gummy candy companies to offer bonbons in gourmet (many vegan-friendly) flavours such as the new Yuzu Mimosa. “When we started, we were just playing with a few vegan [products] but now we’re committed to having the largest vegan assortment out of any gummy company,” Segal says. “Just seeing the demand for it is so exciting.” Squish’s intriguing flavours along with their eye-catching packaging made them a fast favourite for gifting at any occasion.

Today, Squish operates 15 locations across Canada, including Vancouver, Edmonton and Toronto, as well as an e-commerce website. At its new Knightsbridge digs, shoppers visiting from around the world will find Squish’s signature flavours – Prosecco Bears, Wine O’Clock, Vegan Dinosours – to get them in the seasonal spirit.

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Squish Candies at Harrods, 87-135 Brompton Rd., Knightsbridge, London, 44 (0)20 7730 1234, squishcandies.com.

Squish

Squish Candies Yuzu Mimosa, $6.

Squish

Squish Candies Dinosours, $6.

Squish

Squish Candies Chai High, $6.

Style news

Parisian style has arrived at Toronto’s CF Sherway Gardens. Earlier this month, French fashion staples Sandro and Maje each opened a new boutique at the shopping centre. The sister brands are known for their take on French-girl chic, with Sandro also offering a men’s wear category. Celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, Maje has a fall collection that includes plush materials like corduroy, faux fur and knits. For its fall women’s collection, Sandro looked to English tailoring for inspiration and channelled the spirit of the 1970s into its men’s wear. Both boutiques will host shopping events.

Canadian television star and body-positivity activist Roxy Earle has launched a new holiday collection as part of her collaboration with Montreal’s Le Château. With the goal of offering sparkle for all sizes this season, the Roxy Earle x Le Château 2018 Holiday Collection features festive fashion in sizes 0 to 22W. Included in the collection are special-occasion items such as sequin dresses, tops, trousers and jumpsuits, outerwear with on-trend faux-fur trim, form-flattering casualwear and luxe loungewear in pink and grey. To put the finishing touches on holiday dressing, the collection also includes accessories, footwear and handbags. For more information, visit lechateau.com.

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Two big-name retailers have announced special gifting options for the holiday. For the 14th year, Hudson’s Bay has launched Hudson, its limited-edition heritage charity bear. The plush toy is available in store and online, with 100 per cent of net proceeds from the sale of each bear supporting the Hudson Bay Company’s Headfirst program for mental health. Meanwhile, luxury online retailer Net-a-Porter has revealed eight limited-edition fantasy gifts of their finest products, services and experiences. These include experiencing Paris couture week with Chopard, a private gem-setting session with Jaeger-LeCoultre and a yearlong shoe subscription. For the youthful set, Net-A-Porter has also launched a Dolce & Gabbana kidswear pop-up.

On Nov. 28, Toronto’s Aga Khan Museum is hosting Fashion for Social Action, an event focused on the future of fashion that was inspired by the museum’s exhibition Emperors & Jewels, on display until Jan. 27. The panel discussion features four entrepreneurs working on ethical fashion lines, including Pedram Karimi, founder of his namesake gender-free brand, Farrukh Lalani, founder and creative director of handmade jewellery line Zendagi, Sofi Khwaja, who co-founded Alice + Whittles after working with the United Nations in North Africa, and Rami Helali, co-founder and chief executive of Kotn. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit agakhanmuseum.org/programs/fashion-for-social-action.

Visit tgam.ca/newsletters to sign up for the weekly Style newsletter, your guide to fashion, design, entertaining, shopping and living well. And follow us on Instagram @globestyle.

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