Skip to main content

Style Creative party tips from the contemporary artists behind this year’s Power Ball gala

Photograph by Joseph Saraceno; Styling by Wilson Wong

Power Ball, one of Toronto’s more raucous fundraisers, turns 20 on May 31. While its generous bar means most attendees can’t look back on the past decade of bashes with much clarity, its creative installations are usually the most memorable part of the evening.

The team behind this year’s event enlisted Bompas & Parr, a London-based duo known for off-the-wall food art and other multisensory experiences, to take this year’s fete to the next level. “Curating a Flavour Fun Fair is a task few are fit for but we were born for,” says Sam Bompas, one half of the pair. He’s referencing this year’s theme, Carousal, which will reimagine the concept of a carnival. “Our approach will very much be ‘the art of the party,’ taking the bacchanal and elevating it to a place of reverence but also pleasure.”

Sam Bompas, left, and Harry Parr are known for their off-the-wall food art and other multisensory experiences.

Mikael Buck

According to Harry Parr, they have a unique recipe for creating the kind of energy that makes a get-together legendary: “Too many people to physically fit in the space, a powerful theme and some essential elements, which you can treat like a checklist: interesting drinks, live animals, an element of nudity and music over 85 decibels,” he says. “It has been scientifically proven that the music needs to be at least this loud if anyone is to dance.”

Story continues below advertisement

Here, they’ve simplified their unique approach for at-home entertaining.

1. Artsy chocolates

“High-impact bites are a winner. Serve something with colour and panache – if you’re serving something that everyone has eaten before, you’re spoiling their appetite without impressing them.”

Ziggy Stardust Disco Egg, $50, and assorted chocolates, $22.50 for a set of nine at CXBO.

2. Homemade gin

“Making your own liquor is an impressive and inexpensive trick and the equipment required creates a great alchemic lab feel.”

Stainless-steel alcohol infusion vessel, $74.99 at Cocktail Emporium.

3. Fruit cups

“Hollow out bits of fruit like pineapples, melons and pumpkins. Freeze them to use as massive glasses at the party. Tropical!”

Mini seedless watermelon, $4.99 at Sobey’s.

Story continues below advertisement

4. Handwritten invitations

“We’ve lost the art of writing and delivering invitations to our guests. Send them a hard copy and they’ll know you’re serious. You can get creative with the copy to tease out themes and what to expect.”

Carousel pop-up card, $7.95, Ferris wheel pop-up card, $9.95 at Hanji Gifts (hanjigifts.com). Ferris Wheel Press Brush fountain pen and Rohrer & Klinger iron gall ink, $183 at ferriswheelpress.com.

5. Incense

“Make sure you have a fog machine handy. Why shouldn’t your party employ the elements of a film set or rock band arena tour? If the fog machine is out of reach, try incense for a similar smoky haze.”

Concrete Cat incense + ash, $135 at Tokyo Smoke.

Visit tgam.ca/newsletters to sign up for the Globe Style e-newsletter, your weekly digital guide to the players and trends influencing fashion, design and entertaining, plus shopping tips and inspiration for living well. And follow Globe Style on Instagram @globestyle.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter