Skip to main content

Sign up for the weekly Style newsletter, your guide to fashion, beauty and design, and follow us on Instagram @globestyle.

Illustration by Ted Belton

Watches

Many luxury watch faces have ballooned to almost unwearable proportions, but for those looking for a more modestly sized timepiece – say, anything smaller than a dinner plate – relief is in sight. Clocking in at 39 millimetres is Jaeger-LeCoultre’s Master Ultra Thin Moon watch, which is described by the Swiss brand as “purity and nothing else.” Rolex’s 36-mm Datejust doesn’t need to be any bigger to command attention. Its timeless look and history (it was the first self-winding model to display the date) do the trick. The same goes for Cartier’s Santos-Dumont, which boasts a squared-off shape and exposed screws that lend a functionality to its design. Traditional doesn’t mean dull when it comes to Gucci’s skateboard-inspired grip watch, featuring a retro, 38-mm stainless-steel face. And the Forever Fendi watch blends classic and modern via a sleek “FF” logo bracelet and yellow luminescent details. Is smaller better? Only time will tell. – Nadia Pizzimenti

Handout

Santos-Dumont watch at Cartier.

Story continues below advertisement

Handout

Gucci Grip watch at Ssense.

Rolex/Handout

Datejust 36 mm watch at Rolex.

Handout

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra Thin watch through mrporter.com.

Handout

Forever Fendi at Fendi.

Grooming

It wasn’t a dull razor but rather a dull experience that inspired Derrick Webb to rethink his morning shave. While on holiday in Switzerland, he found himself longing for a shave that was more aesthetically appealing than his supermarket blade. “It was really not possible then to find a razor which had a modern or contemporary look and feel about it,” he says. Upon returning home to England, Webb took his idea to technical designers. After a lot of research and development, he launched Bolin Webb in 2011.

Its first product was the R1, a sleek and sexy curved design inspired by the world of automotive racing. “The colours are painted by a partner of ours that specializes in high-end parts for the likes of Jaguar and Rolls Royce,” Webb says. “Nobody else does that.” Bolin Webb has since introduced new designs including the Prestige range, a collection made using top-of-the-line materials including 24-karat gold. Keeping with its car connection, Webb’s X1 Matte features the same flat texture that’s become so popular in automotive finishes.

With price points in the three figures, it may come as a surprise that each razor is made to be fitted with blades by Gillette. “People find the appeal of design and handling very attractive, but they don’t want to be worried about where they can get a replacement blade,” Webb says. “For us, to provide them with the Gillette connection is an easy solution. And we know, too, that Gillette manufactures a very good product.” – Caitlin Agnew

Story continues below advertisement

Bolin Webb X1 Matte razor, US$160 through bolinwebb.com.

Jewellery

Handout

No one rocks a ring like a rebel. Just ask the man behind Boyd Court, a Toronto-based men’s jewellery label forging finger bling that’s equal parts luxe and louche. “I always tried to look at rock stars from the 1960s and seventies and what they would wear,” says the brand’s founder and designer Taylor Hill. Working with gold and silver, and ethically sourced onyx and carnelian stones, he’s hand-making fine jewellery that’s polished without feeling too precious. A nostalgic vibe lends the handsome bands and signet rings the look of something you’ve owned forever but modern details make them fresh. Kind of like a slick cover of a classic. – Bradley Whitehouse

For more information, visit boydcourt.com.

Fashion

Crested blazers and tassel loafers may seem out of place in the streetwear era. But these labels are reinventing Ivy League style for a new generation

RALPH LAUREN

Handout

Leave it to the brand known for polo shirts and embroidered pastel trousers to revive the yacht club look for the 21st century. True to form, this fall’s Purple Label collection features velvet tuxedo jackets, soft wool overshirts and fair isle turtlenecks in sombre blacks and greys.

For more information, visit ralphlauren.com.

J.PRESS

Handout

Founded in New Haven, Conn., in 1902, J. Press is to sack suits as Yeezy is to baggy sweats. Aside from the reliable selection of colourful chinos, this fall’s collection is a timely reminder that any man can look good in corduroys and a toggle coat.

For more information, visit jpressonline.com.

DRAKE’S

Handout

Prep style’s roots lie across the pond in the halls of Oxford and the tailoring of Savile Row. Along with its colourful silk ties, Drake’s sartorial chore coats and unstructured double-breasted blazers represent a softer, British approach to the scholastic look. – Jeremy Freed

For more information, visit drakes.com.

Look for The Globe and Mail Style Advisor magazine’s holiday edition in the newspaper on Nov. 20 and catch up on back issues at tgam.ca/styleadvisor.

Follow related topics

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies