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Style In Montreal’s new Holt Renfrew Ogilvy, David Yurman offers an artful space to bauble shop

The David Yurman boutique on the main level of the new Holt Renfrew Ogilvy in Montreal.

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From outside on Sainte-Catherine Street, the Holts-ification of historic Montreal department store Ogilvy is still very much a work in progress, but step inside and you’ll see some glittering signs of what’s to come. Recent luxury unveilings include a sparkling new David Yurman boutique on the main level. Sitting at 1,200 square feet, it’s more than four times larger than the city’s previous David Yurman space.

The store’s design is emblematic of the American jewellery brand’s classically elegant approach, but with a new sustainable bent, including fixtures made up of 90-per-cent repurposed material. The interior features a wall of black concrete, live-edge walnut, travertine counters and antique bronze touches. Like many David Yurman boutiques, the store’s displays include artwork by husband-and-wife co-founders David and Sybil Yurman, the latter of whom made the brand’s very first cable bracelet design by hand in 1978. On one wall, find a display of paintings by Sybil, who moved to San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district in the late fifties and befriended beatnik greats Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac. The store also houses Mother & Child, a sculpture created by David himself.

Stocking all categories, including women’s, men’s and wedding, this David Yurman boutique is conveniently just a short elevator ride to the new Four Seasons Hotel Montreal, which is connected to Holt Renfrew Ogilvy at the third level. What better way to toast a new bauble than with cocktails at an equally stylish lobby bar?

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David Yurman, Holt Renfrew Ogilvy, 1307 Sainte-Catherine St. W., Montreal, 514-842-7721 ext. 10613, davidyurman.com.

Style news

Toronto-based men’s wear brand 18 Waits has collaborated with local artist Hieram on a gallery show called Changes: The Art of Bowie, opening June 20 at the 18 Waits flagship store (990 Queen St. W., Toronto). The show includes a limited series of raw denim weekender jackets, each painted with imagery of David Bowie. With just eight pieces, the collection pays homage to the late rock icon’s career and relationship with fashion as a tool for personal expression and creativity. For more information, visit 18waits.com.

Toronto luxury shopping centre Yorkville Village is blooming this summer. From June 13 to 17, Vancouver’s Fleurs de Villes is presenting bespoke floral displays that combine a love of flowers with local design talent, including a bloom-filled recreation of a look from the Cannes Film Festival. And every Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., UpMarket: The Floral Edit will be set up with a rotating selection of Toronto’s makers and artisans with a focus on fresh flowers. Presented in collaboration with Brika and Foodie Pages, find gourmet foods, unique gifts and handmade creations on your lunch hour.

Nordstrom is introducing the fourth shop in its continuing series of men’s fashion pop-ups, and this time it has expanded its offerings to include items for women and children. Concept 004: Patagonia focuses on sustainability in collaboration with the outdoor brand. It features Patagonia styles that are fair-trade certified and made with recycled materials and a collection of previously owned products from the brand’s Worn Wear program. Taking place until July 7 online and at Nordstrom Pacific Centre in Vancouver, the pop-up shop features special fixtures created by renowned artist Jay Nelson from reclaimed and sustainable lumber sources. For more information, visit nordstrom.com/newconcepts.

Canadian footwear brand Native Shoes is launching the Plant Shoe, the first sneaker made entirely of plant-derived components. Made from corn, pineapple, cotton, eucalyptus, olive oil and more, it is 100-per-cent biodegradable, free of animal products and boasts a consumer compostable end life. This new addition is part of Native Shoes’ goal to be completely life-cycle managed by 2023. The brand is celebrating this milestone with a pop-up in New York running from June 12 to 19, and the shoe will be available online and at the Vancouver, San Jose and Nantucket stores. For more information, visit nativeshoes.com.

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