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“Maskne” is the term that’s been coined to describe acne that develops on the skin underneath the protective face masks we’re wearing (and I’m going to take this opportunity to remind you of the importance of wearing your masks when required). According to Diana Vo, a holistic facialist in Toronto, the cause of maskne is the collection of sweat, oils and bacteria in the skin coupled with behaviours like moving your mask, which can scratch the skin, and breathing or speaking, which creates additional moisture. Symptoms can include redness, irritation and white bumps that turn into pimples.

To prevent maskne, Vo recommends layering a small piece of paper towel between your mask and your face and changing it throughout the day. “A lot of us can’t change masks on our shifts or are unable to get a lot of masks due to supply. That little protective paper towel is going to act as a barrier.” She also suggests wearing a silk mask when possible, as this fabric is gentler on skin, which leads me to skin care. Vo recommends cleansing skin with a gentle cleanser (one that doesn’t strip oils from the skin) and applying a moisturizer regularly to keep skin hydrated.

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Jilly Ijoe

Vo Beauty Milky Melt-Away Cleansing Balm, $36 through vobeautyco.com.

Need some advice about your skin and hair care routines? Send your questions to ritual@globeandmail.com

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