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The devices that mimic the spa experience in your ensuite. From left: ZIIP GX Series, $618 through ziipbeauty.com. PMD Kiss, $173.45 through PMDbeauty.com. Foreo UFO 2, $349 through foreo.com. Vanity Planet Aira ionic facial steamer, $134.88 through vanityplanet.com. LYMA Laser, $3,199 through lyma.life. Dr. Dennis Gross Drx SpectraLite BodyWare Pro, $542.40 through drdennisgross.com.

Illustration by The Globe and Mail/The Globe and Mail

Interest in home-based skin technology devices such as lasers, radio-frequency tools and light masks has been turbocharged by the pandemic as many consumers spend their spa budget on beauty gadgets. The microneedling tool GloPro and microcurrent device NuFace reported triple-digital sales increases as the world locked down and the industry is projected to have a global value of over $206-billion by 2026.

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These devices promise to do more for your complexion than serums and moisturizers alone and plenty of beauty brands are moving into the electronics space. Proctor and Gamble has been selling its Opte Precision Skincare System in the U.S. since 2020. It is designed to scan skin and deposit product where it’s needed. The Dr. Dennis Gross line offers a do-it-yourself LED light therapy tools to tackle acne and wrinkles.

For those who choose to invest in skintech, consistent use is key to seeing real results. Take the LYMA, an infrared laser that penetrates skin, fat and muscle tissue to stimulate cellular regeneration, for example. Its developers say it needs to be used 15 minutes a day for three months. If you’re ready to make that commitment, these gadgets promise to take your beauty regimen to the next level.

FACE FIRST

Use this app-controlled device with Foero’s power activated masks for a high-level at-home facial. Full spectrum light therapy, hot and cold thermotherapy, and sonic pulsations make it feel suitably futuristic.

Foreo UFO 2, $349 through foreo.com.

STEAM UP

Using an ion generator, the Aira employs steam that penetrates deeply into your pores. After use, skin is soft and hydrated and products absorb like a dream.

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Vanity Planet Aira ionic facial steamer, $134.88 through vanityplanet.com.

ZAP IT

Adapting technology that doctors use to regenerate cartilage in clinical settings, this laser is designed for cosmetic purposes. It’s one of the stronger and priciest at-home tools on the market.

LYMA Laser, $3,199 through lyma.life.

LIP SERVICE

This little device exfoliates chapped lips then uses a gentle, pulsing vacuum to reduce lines and plump up your pout, no fillers necessary. Reviewers say you needn’t fear bruises.

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PMD Kiss, $173.45 through PMDbeauty.com.

LIGHT BRIGHT

A flexible light device, Dr. Dennis Gross’s tool is able to fight wrinkles and acne and is designed to be used anywhere on your body. The brand also offers a mask version created to fit your face.

Dr. Dennis Gross Drx SpectraLite BodyWare Pro, $542.40 through drdennisgross.com.

CONNECTED TISSUE

Lifting? Depuffing? Soothing a breakout? Use the ZIIP app to select what treatment you want this microcurrent device to perform. Then run it gently from collarbone to forehead as instructed.

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ZIIP GX Series, $618 through ziipbeauty.com.

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