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Lost & Found on Ossington Avenue focuses exclusively on men’s wear.

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When it opened its original location on Toronto’s Dundas Street West in early 2011, Lost & Found was a pioneer in the concept of combining shopping with caffeine, housing both a curated selection of men’s and women’s clothing and an espresso bar. “It was a neat endeavour in the sense that having a coffee shop wasn’t necessarily a marketing tool but a tool to bring people in,” says Jonathan Elias who co-owns the store with Justin Veiga. In 2013, Lost & Found moved around the corner to its current location on Ossington Avenue, having switched gears to focus exclusively on men’s wear.

Lost & Found constantly evolves its design and collaborates with local artists.

The emphasis here is on hard-to-find, quality-made men’s fashion. Some of the store’s featured brands include Gitman Vintage, an American-made shirt collection, Beams Plus, a Japanese casual-wear brand, and Denmark’s Norse Projects. Elias’s nurtures a cost-per-wear mentality amongst his clients, citing some of Lost & Found’s footwear as an example of a clothing item that can be repaired rather than tossed.

A visit to Lost & Found is always a new experience, with a constantly evolving design and regular in-house collaborations with local artists including Josh Pong, Robin Nishio and Moya Garrison-Msingwana. Each season, the façade of the store is painted a new colour (for summer 2020, that’s orange) along with custom illustrated decals affixed to the front windows. “One of our mandates is to bring happiness to the community and really promote a positive vibe,” says Elias. “The store has always been built around community and fun.”

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Lost & Found, 44 Ossington Ave., Toronto, 647-348-2810, shoplostfound.com.


Handout

The Real McCoy’s BC20007 Buco Stripe Tee, $135.

Beams Plus Short Sleeve Open Collar Geometric Print Shirt, $150.

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Paraboot Michael Velours Whisky Shoe, $525.

Style news

In celebration of Canada Day, two companies have released new gear that honours the national holiday. Fitness company Peloton (apparel.onepeloton.ca) is launching its first Canada Day Collection. Comprised of nine pieces including performance tank tops, T-shirts and pullovers, each piece features unique icons highlighting Canadian landmarks and symbols, including homages to the cities of Toronto and Calgary. And iconic Canadian fashion brand Roots (roots.com) has recently launched its Canada Collection by Roots. Designed and made in Canada, the collection includes red-and-white hoodies, T-shirts, tank tops and more.

The Toronto Outdoor Art Fair (TOAF) has reinvented itself this year as the Toronto Online Art Fair. Instead of taking place at its usual location, Nathan Phillips Square, this year’s edition will showcase artists through its website and social media feeds. From July 2 to 12, works across a variety of mediums by hundreds of artists ranging from students to the established will be available for purchase. The organization is also organizing virtual events, an awards program and a speaker series. For more information, visit torontooutdoor.art.

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Two Vancouver-based companies have launched new designs that divert waste from landfills. Native Shoes’ (nativeshoes.com) new Davis Repurposed sandal is a spin on an existing sandal style made using leftover material. Available in sizes for adults and children, the bright mosaic design consists of fabric scraps that would otherwise be discarded. Accessories company Herschel Supply (herschel.ca) has also recently launched its new Re-Sail Program, which uses material sourced from used boat sails to produce one-of-a-kind home products and accessories including an apron, pen case, wall organizer and small containers. All proceeds from the Re-Sail Program will be donated to the Vancouver Aquarium.

A new clothing collection called See You Soon Toronto (seeyousoontoronto.com) has already raised more than $100,000 to support industries severely impacted by COVID-19 including hospitality, frontline workers and mental-health support services, as well as local paramedics and firefighters. This creative collaboration between Lifetime Developments’ Brian Brown, graphic artist Ben Johnston and television reporter Tyrone Edwards consists of mood-lifting T-shirts, sweatshirts, hats, masks and artwork. See You Soon Toronto is available online, with one hundred percent of proceeds donated to their local charitable partners.

The Globe has five brand-new arts and lifestyle newsletters: Health & Wellness, Parenting & Relationships, Sightseer, Nestruck on Theatre and What to Watch. Sign up today.

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