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The new store at Sherway Gardens is a bold step in experiential retail, employing multisensory and digital elements.

arash moallemi/Courtesy of Canada Goose

You may not find any clothing for sale at Canada Goose’s newest store in Toronto, but you will find winter. “It’s snowing seven days a week at Sherway Gardens,” says Penny Brook, chief marketing officer at Canada Goose. Without any merchandise available for purchase on site, the new store is a bold step in experiential retail concept, employing multisensory, digital elements to immerse visitors into the chilly world of Canada Goose. “Because you don’t have the shackles of being a transaction-driven experience, that allows you to really embrace a consumer experience that is truly remarkable,” Brook says.

The store's Cold Room has a temperature set at -12 and contains real snow.

arash moallemi/Courtesy of manufacturer

To enter the store, guests step through a two-storey glacier façade into a dark crevasse, where a simulation of an icy surface crackles underfoot. Once inside, impressive 60-foot wide curved screens play 4K videos of vast Canadian landscapes while interactive product displays share information on the technical elements of some of CG’s signature products. In the Cold Room, which has a temperature set at -12 and contains real snow, test a selection of coats against the cold no matter what time of year it is. The pieces can then be ordered online and delivered to your home.

At the heart of this retail endeavour is the storytelling Canada Goose builds around its collections. “We had so many stories of people who’ve experienced the brand and we wanted to transpose those stories into a living space,” Brook says. “The stories that we’re telling here are very much celebrating the fabric of Canada.”

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Canada Goose, CF Sherway Gardens, 25 The West Mall, Etobicoke, Ont., 647-360-8098, canadagoose.com.

Courtesy of Canada Goose

Canada Goose Men’s Hybridge Base Jacket, $695.

Courtesy of Canada Goose

Canada Goose Women’s Hillhurst Pullover, $695.

Courtesy of manufacturer

Canada Goose Women’s Hybridge Knit Jacket, $695.

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