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Fable is a direct-to-consumer dinnerware line founded in Vancouver and inspired by millennial tastes and values.

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With millennials now well into their 30s, many are ditching their assorted hand-me-down dishes and investing in a proper set of dinnerware. Enter Fable, a direct-to-consumer dinnerware line founded in Vancouver by Joe Parenteau, Tina Luu and Max Tims that was inspired by millennial tastes and values. Currently offering a selection of plates, bowls, flatware and serving pieces, Fable was founded with transparency, sustainability and ethical production in mind.

While shopping for tableware at traditional home decor stores, Parenteau found the experience uninspiring. “It didn’t look like it was out of a magazine, it didn’t look like it was on Instagram. I just wanted something that high quality, a brand that I could relate to and ethically crafted,” he says. “I’m a millennial, these things are important to me.” Conversely, the handmade artisanal pieces he gravitated toward were too costly to outfit his entire kitchen with. Partnering with Luu and Tims, Parenteau decided to leave his job in the tech industry and flew to Portugal to find makers who could bring his dream dishware to life.

The trio launched Fable last November with a speckled white stoneware set and have since added blush pink option, with more colours and styles on the horizon. “Every new piece will 100-per-cent match and fit into your collection,” Parenteau says. With unglazed bottoms and subtly asymmetrical shapes, Parenteau says the plates and bowls are meant to feel raw and organic. “That inspiration really came from the origins of the company when we fell in love with artisans who had made stuff by hand.”

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Fable, fablehome.co.


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The Dinnerware Set, $205.

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The Serving Set, $105.

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The Dinner Plates, $68.

Style news

Two of Canada’s premier fashion events have announced new dates and formats for their next instalments. For its 2020 edition, Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto (IFWTO) will be held Nov. 26 to 29 as an online presentation. Originally scheduled to take place in May, the four-day festival will take place at IFWToronto.com and will include digital access to fashion films, a pop-up marketplace and a series of panel discussions. And the Canadian Arts & Fashion Awards (CAFA) plans to host its seventh annual award show gala on May 14, 2021 at the Fairmont Royal York Hotel in Toronto. For more information, visit cafawards.ca.

On Oct. 3, Bayview Village is hosting a complimentary Fashionista Virtual Summit to showcase the Toronto shopping centre’s top fall trends in fashion, food and beauty. Guests can register to participate in the complimentary all-day event and have the option to purchase an upgrade for a one-on-one virtual experience of their choice. These options include digital illustrations, consultations with a fashion stylist and tarot card readings. Attendees can also purchase how-to kits to follow along with instructional sessions led by Hammam Spa by Cela and Parcheggio Ristorante. For more information, visit bayviewvillageshops.com.

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Formica Canada has opened its 2021 Form Student Innovation Competition. The initiative invites architecture and interior design students to showcase their vision of the future by creating furniture pieces using Formica Brand products. The theme of this year’s challenge is Design for the Next Generation and asks students to submit a colour rendering and project statement for a furniture design. Open now through March 12, 2021, winners will be announced next May with the grand prize winner receiving a $2,000 cash award as well as having their design fabricated and displayed during NeoCon 2021 in Chicago. For more information, visit formica.com.

Danish footwear brand Ecco is hosting a pop-up shop at Stackt Market in downtown Toronto. On now until Oct. 29, the Scandinavian-inspired space highlights the brand’s materials, technical innovations and craftsmanship. Ecco’s latest styles are available for purchase including the limited-edition Tannery Series 001, a collection of shopper bags made of upcycled leather from the brand’s tannery in the Netherlands. A group of local illustrators will also be present on select dates to customize a small leather item for guests compliments of Ecco. And when illustrators aren’t onsite, guests can build their own DIY leather item. For more information, visit ca.ecco.com.

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