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The second night of TIFF was a busy one for Armie Hammer. He and fellow actors Dev Petel and Nazanin Boniadi are in town to premiere Hotel Mumbai, director Anthony Maras’s debut feature, which focuses on the Mumbai terrorist attacks that took place 10 years ago. That film was celebrated after its premiere, uptown at The Windsor Arms Hotel in Yorkville, the one-time centre of the festival, where last night though the streets seemed rather sedate, the party inside for Hotel Mumbai, where posh pakoras and an appearance by Hayden Christensen, was anything but.

The Globe's guide to TIFF 2018 movies

For Mr. Hammer and his wife, actor Elizabeth Chambers, this was one of three stops on last night’s social circuit: earlier in the evening at the pre-world premiere party given for director Tim Sutton’s new film Donnybrook at RBC House, the pair made an appearance in support of friend Frank Grillo, who alongside Jamie Bell and Margaret Qualley star in the film.

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Speaking of Ms. Qualley, her mother, model and actress Andie MacDowell, was in-town too, supporting her daughter’s latest work, of course, but also to participate in a panel discussion hosted by festival sponsor L’Oréal Paris, which was moderated by Sangita Patel and held on the top floor of the Globe and Mail Centre which overlooks the city of Toronto. Ms. MacDowell, who has served as a spokesperson for the cosmetic giant for more than three decades was joined by fellow actors Amber Heard and TIFF Share Her Journey Ambassador Shohreh Aghdashloo for a conversation that focused on women in film, and touched on topics including inequality in the movie-making business and the need for more women in directors roles. According to Aghdashloo, only 7 per cent of directors in North America are women.

Meanwhile, over at SoHo House, a mid-day gathering hosted by Grey Goose vodka was in full swing to celebrate Vox Lux, the second directorial feature from actor and director Brady Corbet. Film stars Natalie Portman and Jude Law were both in attendance. Later that night, in the same space, night two culminated with the annual hot-ticket HUGO BOSS-hosted soiree, which this year, hosted alongside Amazon Studios, served as the world premiere celebration for Felix Van Groeningen’s greatly anticipated Beautiful Boy, staring young man of the moment Timothée Chalamet, Steve Carell and Amy Ryan. Mr. Chalamet, who wore a Haider Ackermann embroidered suit, breezed into the party and headed for the second floor of the club where he was later joined by party hopper Mr. Hammer, making for a Call Me By Your Name reunion of sorts. Actor, model and activist Hari Nef, actor Chloe Grace Moretz, and filmmaker Sam Taylor-Johnson were all in attendance too.

In other corners of the city, a bevy of other parties took place: back at RBC House director Yann Demange’s White Boy Rick, which stars Matthew McConaughey, was celebrated before its world premiere earlier in the day. The cast there marked co-star Jonathan Majors’ birthday with a big cake and a lively toast, and nearby at restaurant Montecito, Patricia Clarkson and Aaron Tveit were fêting British director Carol Morley’s new film Out of Blue, in which they star. And finally, at Kost, the restaurant atop the Bisha Hotel, the CBC gave a lunch to laud the 12 CBC-supported films that will premiere during the festival, with filmmakers Darlene Naponse, Deepa Mehta and Patricia Rozema among them in attendance, Mr. Hammer, I can confirm, was not.

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