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The Canadian Film Centre Annual Garden Party, Toronto

Windfields Estate, the onetime home of businessman and racehorse breeder Edward Plunkett Taylor, has housed the Canadian Film Centre since 1988. The charitable organization and training ground has played a role in developing the careers of countless film, television and, more recently, digital creators. The artistic legacy may be immeasurable, but according to a report conducted by the centre, its programs have had a clear economic impact: contributing more than $163-million to the country’s GDP and creating nearly 3,000 jobs between 2008 and 2013. Film director Norman Jewison, the centre’s founder and chair emeritus, and his wife, Lynne St. David-Jewison, were among those on-hand for the latest instalment of its annual summer garden party. This year celebrated the CFC’s 30th anniversary, and brought together supporters and a plethora of past and present board members on the centre’s idyllic campus in North Toronto. Alumni of CFC’s Slaight Music Residency program performed, and chief executive Slawko Klymkiw and a proud Jewison both spoke.

Regarding Space: Cynthia Greig and Vid Ingelevics opening at Peel Art Gallery, Museum and Archives (PAMA), Brampton, Ont.

Canada’s Centennial celebrations in 1967 spurred curiosity and ignited for many citizens a sense of pride in this country’s history. As a result, community museums and galleries that preserved and exhibited Canadian stories began opening across the land. In 1968, this included Peel Heritage Complex in Brampton, Ont. – now known as the Peel Art Gallery, Museum and Archives (PAMA) – which made use of a circa 1867 jail and a registry office. After a multiyear expansion that increased the size of exhibition and studio spaces, PAMA reopened its doors in 2013. Exhibits since then have included Stories of the Black History of Canada and works by Canadian contemporary artist Charles Pachter. Most recently, July 19 was the opening reception for Regarding Space, a show of photographs by Michigan-based artist Cynthia Greig and Toronto artist Vid Ingelevics. The works on display put the institutional spaces in which art is normally viewed into focus, and explores the connection art has to the environments in which it is displayed. The artists were both present, as were exhibition curator Sharona Adamowicz-Clements and the gallery’s senior curator Darrin Martens. The exhibition runs though Sept. 30.

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Editor’s note: A previous version of this story incompletely named Edward Plunkett as the original owner of Windfields Estate. In fact, it is Edward Plunkett Taylor.
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