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Recreational cannabis sales hit record highs this spring as Canadians equipped themselves to face extensive time at home. While the effects of the plant are still being studied, there are new ways to sample it. Instead of a toke, why not try a soak? Cannabis extracts in bath products work alongside more familiar ingredients – including botanicals such as lavender and chamomile and essential oils of jasmine and patchouli – to soothe the body and relax the mind.

A disclaimer before you dive in: “You shouldn’t expect any psychoactive effects,” says Katie Iarocci, the director of product innovation for 48North and Latitude, which recently launched two types of bath salts, one containing CBD and the other with both THC and CBD. Iarocci explains that herbal baths have been used by people for relaxation and pain relief for centuries and that cannabis is simply another herb to add to the repertoire of ingredients. “By soaking in the cannabis bath, you’re able to get a full body experience. The cannabinoids interact with the endocannabinoid system in our skin and they’re able to produce their effect topically.” The result for me was a soothing experience that sent me off to bed with soft, hydrated skin, everything you want from a nice bath.

Handout

Latitude Night Shift Ylang-Ylang Charcoal Bath Salts, $30 at licensed retailers (48nrth.com).

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Need some advice about your skin and hair care routines? Send your questions to ritual@globeandmail.com

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