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Roberto Cavalli may have created a couple of widely touted Coke bottles not long ago, but the relationship between designers and soda pop goes back decades.

In the 1950s, the owners of France's Orangina, a tasty sparkling water/citric juice concoction, commissioned artist Bernard Villemot to create some of the sunniest advertisements ever. And now a young Canadian is following in his brush strokes.

Erica Chia, a Vancouver-born student at the Ontario College of Art & Design, beat out 60 of her peers recently to win the inaugural Orangina Originals student-art competition.

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The OCAD students had been invited by the company to submit Orangina-inspired works for a chance to win a $15,000 educational award and the opportunity to become "Canada's first Orangina artist."

Chia's winning entry, called Orange Meets Gina, features a pair of shapely male and female figures against a fluid orange backdrop and was inspired by the company's "lively and romantic history," Chia says.

"I wanted to use Bernard Villemot's emphasis on shapes and bright colours but also play on the love story that I think Orangina represents," she adds.

To this day, reproductions of Villemot's work continue to adorn bistros and cafés around the world and his original illustrations remain highly sought after.

Although it's unclear whether Chia's work will grace any bottles or ads, a limited series of 150 numbered posters have been printed and are available for purchase.

The posters cost $75 each and can be ordered online through http://www.whodunitoriginals.com. (Orangina was the presenting sponsor of this year's OCAD Whodunit? Mystery Art Sale.) Proceeds from the sale of the prints will go to the OCAD Foundation.

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