Skip to main content

Glentell said Canadian sales of retail mobile phones and services grew 35 per cent in the quarter.

Thinkstock

You may say your heart is true, but the sound of your voice may be telling a different story. New research suggests the pitch of your voice may be ringing alarm bells that you're likely to cheat on a potential mate.

When choosing a partner, women believe the lower the man's voice, the higher the risk he'll be unfaithful. And men think a woman with a higher voice is more likely to stray, according to research out of McMaster University.

"In terms of sexual strategy, we found that men and women will use voice pitch as a warning sign of future betrayal. So the more attractive the voice - a higher pitch for women and lower pitch for men - the more likely the chances he or she will cheat," said lead author Jillian O'Connor, a graduate student in the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, in a press release.

Story continues below advertisement

Participants in the study were asked to listen to two versions of recorded clips from a male voice and a female voice, which were electronically manipulated to be both higher and lower in pitch, according to the release. They were then asked which one, from each pair, was more likely to cheat sexually.

Researchers think that the hormones associated with adulterous behaviour are the middleman: Men with higher testosterone have lower voices and women with higher estrogen have higher pitched voices.

"Overall, the hypothesis makes a lot of sense since men with deeper voices and more testosterone might be more likely to engage in (extramarital) relationships," biological anthropologist David Puts of Penn State told USA Today. He's been been part of studies suggesting men with more "masculine" voices report more sexual partners.

Does this study sound right to you?



Report an error
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

If your comment doesn't appear immediately it has been sent to a member of our moderation team for review

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading…

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.