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Judd Nelson and Molly Ringwald star in The Breakfast Club.

Those Breakfast Club kids grew up and, apparently, they aren't angsty, disheartened, slackers after all.

A new study declares them "active, balanced and happy."

The results are based on a survey of 4,000 Americans between the ages of 36 and 39, part of the Longitudinal Study of American Youth, which has been collecting data since 1987.

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Some key findings:

On the job: Two thirds of respondents said they liked their jobs – with 24 per cent rating their jobs as a nine or 10 (on a satisfaction scale of 10). But they tended to work longer hours and have longer commutes than the adult population as whole.

Kids: 27 per cent read to their kids at least three hours a week, and 80 per cent get on the floor at play Lego at least once a week, as well.

Homework: They have big expectations for their child's education, which may explain why 43 per cent of parents with elementary school children spent five or more hours a week helping with homework. And their homework responsibilities only increase in high school: 66 per cent reported spending five hours or more a week assisting with their child's school work.

Community service: They may not be joining the Lions Club, but 17 per cent belonged to a parent-teacher group, and 18 per cent to a professional group. About one-third said they volunteer in their community each month.

Social skills: In addition to an active digital life , 29 per cent said they talk to friends or family on the phone once a day, and make three or more visits within their social circle each week.

Happiness: Asked to rate their happiness between one and 10, only 4 per cent fell into the very unhappy group (that is three and under.) Instead, 29 per cent of Generation X adults answered with a 9 or 10.

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Ferris Bueller would be proud.

Are you a member of Generation X? How's your life going?

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