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On the plus side, at least the newborn's name is pronounceable.

In what seems too loony to be real, a mother has anointed her baby girl Hashtag Jameson.

A hashtag denotes the number sign (#) on Twitter where it is used as a tagging device, both deliberately and comically.

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As in, #dumbbabyname.

Mother Jameson gave birth at 10 p.m. on Sunday night and posted a picture to Facebook – ironically, not Twitter – on Monday.

She either bolstered or damaged her credibility (hard to tell) by appending the following message to the photo: "Hashtag Jameson was born at 10 oclock last nite. She weys 8pounds and i luv her so much!!!!!"

Let's just hope mum doesn't teach her baby how to #spell.

So is this just a social media meta stunt? As of now, it's unclear. Presumably, the mother has given thought to her baby's 15 minutes of fame as a trending topic. In order to draw attention to the baby's name on Twitter, it would need to be tagged #Hashtag.

The Telegraph's coverage of the story points out that puzzling baby names have become more and more de rigueur. In May, 2011, an Israeli couple named their baby Like after the Facebook feature.

At the time, father Lior Adler told Israeli newspaper Maariv that it was a more modern spin on Ahava, or Love.

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In North America, the # symbol is widely known as "pound" – which is not to be confused with the unit of currency (maybe Hashtag's parents are hoping to make £500,000 from this exercise) or weight (although, Kilo, isn't actually half-bad...).

The thing the Jamesons must realize about their social media-inspired baby is that it sets the bar high. It's not like they can name their next kid Michael. And at this point, Atsign just sounds derivative.

Yes, Hashtag is singular alright. She's too young to realize the repercussions of her name. That will come after she's learned to #crawl, #walk, #talk and #read.

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