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In this Friday April 11, 2008. file photo, Britain's Prince William and his girlfriend Kate Middleton walk together at RAF Cranwell, England, after William received his RAF wings from his father the Prince of Wales.

(AP Photo/Michael Dunlea, Pool, File)/(AP Photo/Michael Dunlea, Pool, File)

The most famous yet-to-be revealed dress in the world is being designed by the bride herself. Kate Middleton's wedding dress is top secret, but that hasn't stopped the British media from trying to parse the details together from leaked snippets here are there.

The latest breathless news, quoting an "impeccably placed source," London's Daily Mail suggests that Ms. Middleton began designing her own dress immediately after her engagement, taking her cue from "the Renaissance period," (For fashion samples click here)which she studied in Florence during her gap year.

The dress will also offer a "nod" to Princess Diana's wedding gown, minus the "flounce," the Mail reports. It has reportedly been created by 34-year-old Sophie Cranston, whose label Libelula was created in 2002, and includes a bridal collection. (Kate Middleton has worn Libelula before- in January she sported this velvet coat.)

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The dress, kept under lock and key at Clarence House, is made of " ivory satin and lace, with a pearl button detail and 10 foot train," according to the Mail.

And some lucky bidder will have the pleasure of taking the gown home after royal wedding. It will be put up for auction to raise money for charity.

Are you excited - even a little - to see what the soon-to-be princess will wear?

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