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Another headache for breastfeeding moms: one woman is suing after her feeding routine was posted on YouTube and then to porn sites.

In 2010, New Jersey mother MaryAnn Sahoury demonstrated breastfeeding techniques with her month-old daughter in a video for Parents TV, which broadcasts original videos on childrearing. She had trouble feeding and did the video to instruct other women.

"I did this to help other moms," Ms. Sahoury, 35, told The Associated Press, noting that she wasn't even paid.

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After the shoot was over, the woman made her only mistake: She signed a waiver without reading it as she juggled her daughter.

Half a year later, Ms. Sahoury, who still hadn't seen the video yet, did something we all do and Googled herself. To her horror, up popped numerous porn sites and videos containing her full name. She clicked on one and saw her breastfeeding video for Parents TV spliced with a pornographic video of a woman with "similar features and stature." Even worse, when Ms. Sahoury then Googled her infant daughter's name, it also returned links to porn.

"It was terrifying," Ms. Sahoury told AP.

Consumed by the discovery, she spent days and nights surfing the web to report the sites. She managed to remove some of the videos and even believes she found the person who had disseminated and twisted the material.

Now, the mother is suing the Iowa-based company that produced the video and somehow let it fall into the hands of a third party who created the porn montage. The lawsuit claims the video was put on YouTube, even though she was told it would appear only on Parents TV and cable TV. In addition, the lawsuit states that Ms. Sahoury's full name was used in the video when she was told by the producer it was a first-name only deal.

In a statement, representatives for the production company said they'd hired lawyers to file take-down demands as well as Internet specialists to clear online caches, even though "Ms. Sahoury signed a full release for herself and her daughter."

Ms. Sahoury hopes her suit will lead to greater Internet protections: "I never want this to happen again," she said.

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