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If you thought it was tough getting your child into a top-notch private school, try getting your dog into an exclusive doggy daycare.

When it comes to securing a spot at some American canine daycares, dogs and their owners must undergo a rigorous screening process, not unlike those required for elite preschools, according to The Wall Street Journal. Not only must they submit multi-page applications, there are interviews involved, and hours of monitoring during playtime.

The WSJ followed Karen Serafinko and her Maltese, Cannoli, as they vied for the approval of evaluators at Long Island City's Camp Bow Wow. During the interview, Ms. Serafinko was asked a host of questions, like "Will your dog share toys with other dogs?"

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Cannoli was then observed over a TV monitor as he played with other dogs in a yard. To conclude the evaluation, Ms. Serafinko left her pooch alone at the canine camp for three hours to see how he would fit in.

Cannoli was lucky; he passed. But Ms. Serafinko told the newspaper her previous pet would have never made the cut.

"Our first dog, Skittles, was the nervous one. He would have definitely failed the interview," she said.

The rigmarole might seem over the top, but doggy daycare owners emphasize they need to weed out aggressive or overly timid and nervous dogs to ensure the safety and happiness of those in their care.

In reality, the WSJ says, only about five to 10 per cent of applicants are actually rejected at the canine camps. Businesses typically charge around $25 to $32 U.S. for eight hours of dog care during the day, and $35 to $55 U.S. for overnight boarding.

Dog owners, what lengths would you go to in order to put your pup in daycare?

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