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Frequent fliers understand the suspense of weighing in at a gate: Will my carry-on make the cut? And now a Canadian-owned luggage company is making a big bet that travellers will want to avoid the issue - by weighing their own luggage on the road. Heys Canada is now selling the xScale ($30), billed as "the world's smallest portable luggage scale" and good for bags up to 50 kilograms.

To capitalize on the current rise in surcharges, Heys has launched the product with a $500,000 ad campaign that sees it advertised on billboards and in bus shelters in Toronto, Montreal, Edmonton, Calgary and Vancouver.

Although exact sales figures aren't yet available, Heys president Emran Sheikh says customer response has been overwhelming. "We're getting feedback from stores saying that as soon as they put it out it's sold in the next half-hour," he says. "With weight restrictions being what they are, everybody wants to know quickly and accurately what their luggage weighs."

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Excess baggage fees are becoming a "major concern" for travellers, says Rochelle Brown, a senior travel consultant at Carlson Wagonlit Travel. "Nobody wants to pay extra to travel. We're getting nickeled and dimed to death by the airlines."

Which raises a question: How much weight does the xScale

itself add to your bag? Just four ounces. Anxious travellers,

take a load off.

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