Skip to main content

1. Guzzle the H2O

Sometimes you need to impress right after a long flight touches down: You’re headed to a meeting perhaps, or maybe a long-distance love is waiting on the other end. The No. 1 for not looking like the exhausted traveller you are: drink water. A lot of water. Experts recommend eight ounces for every hour you’re in the air.

2. Feed your skin

Story continues below advertisement

If you don’t stay hydrated, it’s going to show on your skin. My secret: I start my offensive preboarding by heading to the duty-free and “sampling” the richest facial moisturizer I can find. Some jet-setters swear by indulging in a full sheet mask during flight, but if that’s too embarrassing, go for one that covers just the eye area and hide it with a sleep mask.

3. Dress the part

If you can manage it, keep a second outfit handy for a quick change at the first airport bathroom you see. In any case, look for wrinkle-free fabrics such as wool, knits and Tencel. High-quality skirts and dresses in polyester travel like a dream. And, in most situations, it’s hard to go wrong with dark denim, a simple shirt and a smart blazer (ask a flight attendant to hang it, or fold and lay flat in the overhead bin after all luggage has been placed).

4. Wake yourself up

If you’re not in the right mindset, doing all of the above will only help you so much. You need to get past the drudgery and find a place of excitement. Find what works for you. Listen to favourite songs, have a coffee before landing, sprint to customs control – whatever gets your endorphins flowing and blood pumping.

5. Wear sunglasses

If all else fails, this is your best option. There is a reason celebrities always wear sunglasses while walking through the arrivals area: It’s the easiest way to hide a multitude of eye-related unpleasantness: bags, dark circles and bloodshot whites. If you’re plunging right into sightseeing, just leave them on for pics.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter